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Articles / AP Exam Prep: Tips to Help You Do Your Best On the Tests

May 19, 2021

AP Exam Prep: Tips to Help You Do Your Best On the Tests

AP Exam Prep: Tips to Help You Do Your Best On the Tests
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The year-long work of your AP courses is all leading to one thing: the AP exam. And while these exams can cover a lot of content (even more than the SAT and ACT), they also have certain strategies that can be used to make even the most daunting AP subjects more manageable when exam season rolls around. Here's a general overview to help you prep for your Advanced Placement Exams.

How to Study for Your AP Exams

Take a Practice Test

The AP Exams are just like any other standardized test, so my first piece of advice is to take a practice test. One aspect of AP Exams that differs from a lot of other standardized tests is that they are very content-driven. That gives practice tests the added benefit of reminding you of what you've covered over the entire course. Plus, it can also give you an idea of what topics you might need to review before the exam. Once you've got a sense of where your strengths are and where you could use a refresher, you can put together a game plan to tackle that material in whatever time you have left before the test.

Study the Exam

Each Advanced Placement Exam is two to three hours long and will include some mixture of multiple-choice, free-response and/or essay questions. However, each test has a different number of questions, and graders will look for different things in the open-ended portions of the test, depending on the subject. While it's true that every test is scored on a scale from 1 to 5, the requirements for each score vary greatly between the exams.

Luckily, there is plenty of information available about the AP Exams to help you prepare beforehand. I strongly recommend you do whatever you can to avoid going into a test like this blind, so take a look at official practice questions and scoring information for your AP Exam in advance of your test day — and consider using an AP Cram Course or AP Tutoring to recap. Knowing what's on a test and how it's scored will get you on your way to maximizing your score.

Review Your Performance

Once you've learned about the Advanced Placement Exam you'll be taking, go back to your practice test. We've already discussed the need for brushing up on content areas where you don't feel strong, but you can also use your work to improve your overall test-taking strategy. Did you spend too much time on certain types of questions and then have to rush the others? Were there questions that would have been better skipped and revisited if you had time left over at the end of the section? Be sure that you not only figure out what content you need to know, but how to beat any test-taking habits you might have from your other, more traditional classroom exams.

Whether you're looking for help with content review or some general strategy tips, The Princeton Review has you covered. Check out our line of AP study guide books, which offer you a breakdown of each test and how each is scored. With a good understanding of what to expect on the test as well as a solid content review, you'll be on your path to a 5 during AP Exam season.

This article first appeared in May 2019

AP Computer Science A Exam: What's On It and How To Prepare

There's a lot of science on the AP Biology Exam — three hours' worth, to be precise. Trying to memorize every little fact and figure from the class can stress out a lot of students, so I'm here to help you stay calm in the days leading up to the test. Here's a breakdown of what you can expect to see on the exam so you can get your preparation off on the right foot.

Course Concepts

The multiple-choice section not only pulls from a very specific series of AP Biology topics, but also has a set percentage for how highly each one is weighted. From most to least important, here they are:

  • Natural Selection (13-20%)
  • Gene Expression and Regulation (12-16%)
  • Cellular Energetics (12-16%)
  • Ecology (10-15%)
  • Cell Communication and Cell Cycle (10-15%)
  • Cell Structure and Function (10-13%)
  • Chemistry of Life (8-11%)
  • Heredity (8-11%)

It's always a good idea to take a practice test to see roughly how well you understand each topic. That way, if you only have time to brush up on one section, you can focus on the one that's likelier to earn you more points.

If you already feel confident with the content, don't take it too easy. The test writers will often try to trip you up with the language of the questions themselves, so once you know the subject, make sure you understand the language of the test — specifically, what types of questions you'll face, again, weighted from least to most common on the test:

  • Concept Explanation (25-33%)
  • Argumentation (20-26%)
  • Visual Representations (16-24%)
  • Questions and Methods (8-14%)
  • Representing and Describing Data (8-14%)
  • Statistical Tests and Data Analysis (8-14%)

As you can see, the majority of the test is going to focus on your ability to describe biological processes, often in question-specific contexts or illustrative models, as well as how well you can make and support scientific claims. However, at least a third of the remaining questions will test your ability to read or construct graphs, plots or charts and to perform mathematical calculations or otherwise work with data, so make sure you're not just memorizing concepts alone.

Multiple Choice

The first section on the exam will ask you to tackle 60 multiple-choice questions in 90 minutes. Your results here will account for exactly half of your total exam score. Not only will you see individual questions that test more general concepts and knowledge, but you'll also see sets of four or five questions that share a common set of data in a table, refer to a figure or two, or are centered around a specific theme.

Before you get too anxious, I'll tell you that by no means are you required to answer every single question in order to score well. Instead, it's imperative that you take practice tests beforehand so you are able to recognize which questions you can answer and which questions you can skip when you take the actual exam. (And for those questions you skip, be sure to still put in your Letter of the Day (LOTD), as there's no guessing penalty on any AP Exams.) Practicing this will help you maximize your score by targeting your strongest concepts and only returning to those that challenge you if you have extra time.

Free Response

The second section will consist of six free response questions in total, and you'll have 90 minutes to answer them. These will account for the other half of your total exam score. The first two questions in this section will be longer than the others, and they'll each focus on your ability to interpret and evaluate the results of a given experiment. The difference here is that the first will provide you with a graph and/or table representing those results, while the second will require you to create a data representation of your own as part of your response.

As for the remaining four shorter questions, one will look at the results of a lab (Scientific Investigation), another will deal with a real-world biological phenomenon (Conceptual Analysis), the third will require you to describe and explain an illustration (Analyze Model or Visual Representation) and the last will present you with data from a table that you'll have to accurately describe (Analyze Data). You may have noticed that the open-ended section is essentially asking you to do the same things you've just done in the multiple-choice — the main difference is that instead of having to pick out the right answer, you'll have to find it on your own.

One final note: If you're worried about doing any of the math required on either section, don't be! You'll be allowed to use a calculator on the entire exam.

With a good understanding of the exam format, you'll be on your way to snagging the score you want on the AP Biology Exam. For extra strategy and a crucial content review, check out our prep book for this exam. And you can always find even more free content on our YouTube channel, so be sure to subscribe.

This article first appeared in February 2020

AP Biology Exam: What's On It and How to Prepare

AP Exam Prep: Tips to Help You Do Your Best On the Tests - 2 person holding black and white microscope

There's a lot of science on the AP Biology Exam — three hours' worth, to be precise. Trying to memorize every little fact and figure from the class can stress out a lot of students, so I'm here to help you stay calm in the days leading up to the test. Here's a breakdown of what you can expect to see on the exam so you can get your preparation off on the right foot.

Course Concepts

The multiple-choice section not only pulls from a very specific series of AP Biology topics, but also has a set percentage for how highly each one is weighted. From most to least important, here they are:

  • Natural Selection (13-20%)
  • Gene Expression and Regulation (12-16%)
  • Cellular Energetics (12-16%)
  • Ecology (10-15%)
  • Cell Communication and Cell Cycle (10-15%)
  • Cell Structure and Function (10-13%)
  • Chemistry of Life (8-11%)
  • Heredity (8-11%)

It's always a good idea to take a practice test to see roughly how well you understand each topic. That way, if you only have time to brush up on one section, you can focus on the one that's likelier to earn you more points.

If you already feel confident with the content, don't take it too easy. The test writers will often try to trip you up with the language of the questions themselves, so once you know the subject, make sure you understand the language of the test — specifically, what types of questions you'll face, again, weighted from least to most common on the test:

  • Concept Explanation (25-33%)
  • Argumentation (20-26%)
  • Visual Representations (16-24%)
  • Questions and Methods (8-14%)
  • Representing and Describing Data (8-14%)
  • Statistical Tests and Data Analysis (8-14%)

As you can see, the majority of the test is going to focus on your ability to describe biological processes, often in question-specific contexts or illustrative models, as well as how well you can make and support scientific claims. However, at least a third of the remaining questions will test your ability to read or construct graphs, plots or charts and to perform mathematical calculations or otherwise work with data, so make sure you're not just memorizing concepts alone.

Multiple Choice

The first section on the exam will ask you to tackle 60 multiple-choice questions in 90 minutes. Your results here will account for exactly half of your total exam score. Not only will you see individual questions that test more general concepts and knowledge, but you'll also see sets of four or five questions that share a common set of data in a table, refer to a figure or two, or are centered around a specific theme.

Before you get too anxious, I'll tell you that by no means are you required to answer every single question in order to score well. Instead, it's imperative that you take practice tests beforehand so you are able to recognize which questions you can answer and which questions you can skip when you take the actual exam. (And for those questions you skip, be sure to still put in your Letter of the Day (LOTD), as there's no guessing penalty on any AP Exams.) Practicing this will help you maximize your score by targeting your strongest concepts and only returning to those that challenge you if you have extra time.

Free Response

The second section will consist of six free response questions in total, and you'll have 90 minutes to answer them. These will account for the other half of your total exam score. The first two questions in this section will be longer than the others, and they'll each focus on your ability to interpret and evaluate the results of a given experiment. The difference here is that the first will provide you with a graph and/or table representing those results, while the second will require you to create a data representation of your own as part of your response.

As for the remaining four shorter questions, one will look at the results of a lab (Scientific Investigation), another will deal with a real-world biological phenomenon (Conceptual Analysis), the third will require you to describe and explain an illustration (Analyze Model or Visual Representation) and the last will present you with data from a table that you'll have to accurately describe (Analyze Data). You may have noticed that the open-ended section is essentially asking you to do the same things you've just done in the multiple-choice — the main difference is that instead of having to pick out the right answer, you'll have to find it on your own.

One final note: If you're worried about doing any of the math required on either section, don't be! You'll be allowed to use a calculator on the entire exam.

With a good understanding of the exam format, you'll be on your way to snagging the score you want on the AP Biology Exam. For extra strategy and a crucial content review, check out our prep book for this exam. And you can always find even more free content on our YouTube channel, so be sure to subscribe.

This article first appeared in April 2020

AP Environmental Science Exam: What's On It and How To Prepare

As the seasons change, so do the AP Exams. As of 2020, the AP Environmental Science exam is undergoing some slight modifications. "Weather" you've got the test on your schedule in the hopes of impressing prospective colleges, or simply because you enjoy the subject, you'll want to be aware of the changes. To help, here's a breakdown of what you can expect to see on the exam, as well as some advice to help you out along the way.

Course Concepts

In order to fully understand the AP Environmental Science Exam, you should first be familiar with what the test makers expect you to learn in the corresponding AP Course. For AP Environmental Science, the College Board has seven set learning objectives— in this case called "Science Practices" — that you'll be assessed on:

1. Concept Explanation – Explain environmental concepts, processes and models presented in written format.
2. Visual Representations – Analyze visual representations of environmental concepts and processes.
3. Text Analysis – Analyze sources of information about environmental issues.
4. Scientific Experiments – Analyze research studies that test environmental principles.
5. Data Analysis – Analyze and interpret quantitative data represented in tables, charts and graphs.
6. Mathematical Routines – Apply quantitative methods to address environmental concepts.
7. Environmental Solutions – Propose and justify solutions to environmental problems.

To test your abilities here, the Environmental Science Exam will be split into two sections: Multiple-Choice and Free Response. This is similar to how many of the other AP exams are structured, though the number of questions in each section and the types of questions as well as their content are naturally different.

Multiple-Choice Section

Starting with the 2020 administration of this exam, the multiple-choice section will include 80 questions that you'll have 90 minutes to answer. This section will account for 60 percent of your final 1-5 exam score.

The 80 questions here will mostly be organized into question sets. Sets that focus on quantitative data tend to include a chart, graph or data table. Those that include models, maps or representations mainly look at qualitative data. A final type of set, which will appear twice on the test, is based on text-based sources (aka passages). In addition to these sets, which make up the bulk of the multiple-choice section, you should also be prepared for individual questions sprinkled throughout that will test more general knowledge and concepts related to the subject.

Free Response Section

Once you're finished with the first section, you'll move onto a series of three free response questions you'll have 70 minutes to answer. These will — you may have guessed it! — account for the other 40 percent of your overall score. There are two main types of questions; in one, you'll have to design an investigation. In the other two, you'll have to analyze an environmental problem and propose a solution. The key difference there is that one of those proposed solutions will require mathematical calculations.

Overall, what both sections share in common is a need to analyze quantitative and qualitative data. Something else you can do on both parts of the test? Use your calculator whenever you need it!

With a solid knowledge of the exam format, you'll be well on your way to scoring well on the AP Environmental Science Exam. For additional strategy and an all-important content review, pick up our prep book for this exam. And don't forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel so you don't miss out on any content to keep you even more informed.

This article first appeared in March 2020

AP World History - Modern Exam: What's On It and How To Prepare

AP Exam Prep: Tips to Help You Do Your Best On the Tests - 4 Colosseum arena photography

Here's a fun "history" fact for those of you considering taking the AP World History exam to add some rigor to your high school record, or to further explore a subject you already love. As of 2020, the test, now called the AP World History: Modern exam, only covers material from 1200 C.E. onward. You're no longer going to be tested on the over 11,000 years of earlier history that the exam once included. To help you get even more of an edge on the new test, here's a breakdown of the sections of the exam, as well as some advice to help you out along the way.

Multiple-Choice

You're given 55 minutes to complete the 55 questions in the multiple-choice section. Your results will account for 40 percent of your total exam score. The test makers' goal here is to assess your ability to analyze historical texts, interpretations and evidence. Questions in this section are grouped into sets of three or four related questions that share primary or secondary documents, images, graphs and maps. The majority of the questions will be pretty straightforward once the context of the source is understood. However, there are two major tricks you may encounter:

  • First, you may see questions that ask you to identify that the answer that is not true. The best strategy here is to mark each answer choice as "true" or "false," and to then pick the "odd one out." Doing so will help keep you from forgetting that you're looking for the false answer.
  • Second, you may be asked to interpret an illustration (often a map or other type of graphic). These questions are usually pretty basic, so my advice is to stick to what is presented in the graphic. Don't try to read too much between the lines. To save time, read the question first, and then go to the graphic so you know exactly what you're looking for.

Short Answer

There are four short-answer questions in the second section of the test, but you only have to answer three of them. The first two (required) questions cover the entire time period covered by the course; questions three and four give you a choice between a question about the years 1200 through 1750 (question 3) or from 1750 to 2001 (question 4). You'll have 40 minutes to answer questions 1, 2, and your choice of 3 or 4, and your score here will account for 20 percent of your overall exam score.

The goal of this section is to assess your ability to analyze historians' interpretations, historical sources and propositions about history. Some questions will include texts, images, graphs or maps for you to use in your answer. You'll be given a page to write each answer, but it is not necessary to use all of that space — quality matters more than quantity.

Essays

In the final section of the AP World History: Modern exam, you'll tackle not just one but two essays. The good news is that they're not all that different from each other. Each will ask you to build an argument that's supported by an analysis of historical evidence; the difference is that one essay will provide you with documents that you'll use to build that argument while the other will expect you to supply the necessary information from your own memory.

The first is called the document-based question and it accounts for 25 percent of your exam score. You'll be given seven documents that offer various perspectives on a historical development or process, and you'll have one hour to formulate your argument using them. Do note that this one-hour period includes a 15-minute reading period as well, which I always recommend taking advantage of in order to wrap your head around all of the content. The second essay will occupy the final 40 minutes of the exam period, and it will also make up the last 15 percent of your total score.

With a firm understanding of the exam, you'll be well on your way to scoring how you want to on the AP World History: Modern Exam. For added strategy and a thorough content review, check out our prep book for this exam. Plus, head over to our YouTube channel for additional content covering topics such as overcoming test anxiety and what to do the day before a big test.

This article first appeared in March 2020

AP US History Exam: 4 Ways to Craft an Argument

AP Exam Prep: Tips to Help You Do Your Best On the Tests - 5 Mount Rushmore

If you're taking the AP US History Exam, you'll need to prepare for two different types of essays. One, the document-based question (DBQ), is worth 25 percent of your final score. The other, which is misleadingly called a "long" essay — it's about the same length as the DBQ — is worth 15 percent. For both, you should utilize the traditional five-paragraph structure, although if you have time, you can use more than three body paragraphs to make your argument. Also, be sure that you're answering the question the College Board actually asks, a part of which means fulfilling the requirements of the scoring rubric. Here are four ways to make the most of those paragraphs as you craft your argument.

Three Good Points

If you're taking some time to brainstorm ideas and take notes as you read the documents or consider your long essay argument — which is something I wholeheartedly recommend! — the simplest strategy is to refer back to those notes, taking your three strongest points and giving each its own body paragraph. If these points are related, put them in the order that makes the most sense to you. If each stands alone, save your strongest point for last and put the weakest of your three points in the middle of your essay.

The Chronological Argument

Many potential essay questions lend themselves to a chronological order. In fact, questions about the development of a political, social or economic trend can hardly be answered any other way! When you make a chronological argument, look for important transitions and use them to start new paragraphs.

A five-paragraph essay about the events leading up to the Civil War, for example, might start with an introductory discussion of slavery and regional differences in the early 19th century. This is also where you should state your thesis. The second paragraph might then discuss the Missouri Compromise and other efforts to avoid the war. The third paragraph could mention the expansionism of the Polk era and how it forced the slavery issue, and the fourth might cover the collapse of the Missouri Compromise and how the events that followed led the country into war. Your conclusion in this type of essay should restate the question and answer it. For example, if the question asks whether the war was inevitable, you should answer "yes" or "no" in this paragraph.

Comparison

Some questions ask you to compare events, issues or policies. Very often, the way the question is phrased will suggest the best organization for your essay. For example, take a question asking you to compare the impact of three events and issues on the United States' decision to enter World War II. This question pretty much requires you to start by setting the historical scene prior to the three events/issues you are about to discuss. Continue by devoting one paragraph to each of the three and conclude by comparing and contrasting the relative importance of each.

Other questions will provide options. If you're asked to compare political philosophies of two presidents, you might tackle a single subject in each paragraph. For example, one could focus on their interpretation of the Constitution, another on their differing approaches to foreign policy, and a third on their policies toward the American economy. In the final paragraph, you can draw your conclusion, but be certain you state your argument in your thesis at the beginning.

The "Straw Man" Argument

In this structure, you will choose a couple of arguments that someone taking the position opposite yours would take. State their arguments, and then tear them down. However, it is important to note that solely proving your opposition wrong does not mean you have proven that you are correct; that is why you should choose only a few opposing arguments to refute. Summarize your opponent's arguments in paragraph two, dismiss them in paragraph three, and use paragraph four to make the argument for your side.

Alternatively, choose three of your opponent's arguments and in each of your body paragraphs, summarize and dismiss a different one of them. For this method, you'll then make the case for your side in your concluding paragraph. Acknowledging both sides of an argument, even when you choose one over the other, is a good indicator that you understand that historical issues are complex and can be interpreted in more than one way — which teachers and readers like to see.

Having realistic expectations about what you'll see on the AP US History Exam is your best way to snag the score you want. For more about this particular test, check out our prep book. And for more test-taking tips and advice on getting into college, head over to our YouTube channel where you'll find regular new content.

This article first appeared in March 2020

4 Facts About the AP US History Document-Based Question

If you're a college-bound junior or senior, there's a pretty good chance you've got one or two (or more!) AP Exams slotted into your schedule. Each exam is unique in how it will test your knowledge of the relevant content and concepts, so it's crucial to be aware of your specific tests before showing up to take them. If you plan to take the AP US History Exam, one of those elements you'll want to be aware of is what's called the Document-Based Question (DBQ). Here are a few details to help you prep before the test.

1. What Documents Are the DBQ Based on?

The DBQ is an essay question that requires you to interpret a mix of textual and visual primary source documents. There will be six or seven documents that accompany the question, including many (or all!) of the following:

  • Newspaper articles/editorials
  • Letters or diaries
  • Speeches
  • Excerpts from legislation
  • Political cartoons
  • Charts or graphs

Occasionally, these will be drawn from something "classic" that you may have previously seen in a textbook, but typically they'll be lesser-known documents that are new to you. Still, while the documents themselves may be unfamiliar, the event or idea they are relevant to will be something you've studied in the AP class.

2. How Long Is the DBQ?

The DBQ occurs during the second section of the test and will last for about 60 minutes. (You will have a total of 100 minutes for Section II of this exam, which includes both the DBQ and the long essay, but the College Board recommends you spend 60 minutes of that time on the DBQ.) You'll receive a green booklet containing the question and the appropriate documents. You'll also receive a separate booklet in which to write your essay.

Now, an hour may seem like a lot, but it's important to have a strategy going in so you don't lose track of time and end up scrambling. The College Board provides a 15-minute reading period, and my advice is that you use this time not only to do so, but also to start planning your essay with an outline or something similar.

3. Is There a "Right" Answer to the DBQ?

In short, no. DBQs are worded in such a way that you can argue any number of positions. Plus, the question is often one that historians have been debating for years. So, similar to the essay on the ACT, as long as you support your argument here with evidence from the provided documents, you can argue whatever thesis you want.

That said, because evidence is required, you should avoid choosing a thesis that's not fully supported by the documents. If you notice, while reading, that the documents are leaning toward a particular thesis, it is likely to be easier to support an argument of that nature. The last thing you want to do is start with an argument you think you can make, only to get about halfway through your essay and realize most of the evidence points to the contrary.

4. How Is the DBQ Scored?

In 2019, the College Board introduced a rubric that graders use to score the DBQ essay. Before this, the essay was scored more "holistically," which made test takers' jobs a bit harder. Now you know exactly what College Board is looking for, so give it to them! The DBQ counts for 25 percent of your overall 1 to 5 score on the exam.

For more information on the document-based question on the AP US History exam, pick up our prep book. It contains the most up-to-date information in terms of the test structure and strategies to help you score your highest. You'll also find a thorough content review and practice tests to help you study before the big day.

This article first appeared in February 2020

How Are AP Exams Scored?

AP Courses are becoming more and more common on the schedules of high school students for multiple reasons. They're a great way to prep for the coursework you'll be facing in college, sure, but they also offer the opportunity to start your first year of undergrad with some prerequisites already out of the way. (It's basically a head start.) A question I get quite regularly is, "What is an acceptable AP score?" Well, the answer — as with much of the college application process — really comes down to one person: you.

Here's a breakdown of how AP scoring works, how it can benefit you in gaining college credit and why you should consider taking AP courses outside of that.

How the Scores Work

To rank your performance throughout an AP course, and therefore the AP Exam, the tests are graded on a 1 to 5 scale with the following classifications:

5 = Extremely well qualified

4 = Well qualified

3 = Qualified

2 = Possibly qualified

1 = No recommendation

More practically, the College Board equates a score of five to an A in the equivalent college-level course, a four to the range of an A- to a B, and a score of three to the range of a B- to a C. Now, this isn't necessarily indicative of how you performed over the course of the entire year, but it is indicative of how you performed on the exam. (That's why it's important to take some AP Exam prep, just as you would for the SAT or ACT!) And despite this being the official way in which the College Board treats each score, that doesn't mean that each school will handle scores equally.

How Schools Handle Scores

Colleges typically accept scores of four or five, giving you credit for the course either in the form of college credits directly or more advanced course placement (thanks to a prerequisite being fulfilled by the AP course). Some colleges will accept a score of three on many AP Exams for the same purpose, and there are very rare cases of colleges giving some amount of credit or placement for a two — but scoring a one on an AP Exam carries no benefits when your score report arrives at the admissions office. (You get a one on an AP Exam just for showing up!)

Do note that there are some colleges that don't recognize AP scores at all, so be sure to check out the AP Credit Policy Search from the College Board so you know what your prospective schools' policies are in advance.

Benefits Outside of College Credit

Just because a school doesn't honor AP scores for credit or placement doesn't mean you should avoid AP courses altogether. Outside of the above benefits, they some are just downright interesting, which can be reason enough to enroll! Plus, these courses are a great way to boost the rigor of your high school record, which is something colleges look for when making admissions decisions. Adding a few of these courses to your high school schedule will show that you're willing and able to complete college coursework. Of course, it's important that you're able to keep up with the course as well. Simply having it on your schedule won't do the trick; you'll have to earn the grade to show your effort. So check with your school advisors or your AP teachers if you're unsure what level of work is involved in an AP class and to determine if it will fit well with your schedule. And that goes for any student considering an AP class, whether for college credit or not.

I know this isn't a black-and-white answer, but whether you should take an AP really depends on the score you think you need, and how achievable you think it will be given your schedule. That said, if you can earn an acceptable AP score, which varies from school to school, I certainly think you should go for it. There's always some sort of perk — whether that be advanced course placement, course credit or simply an edge when applying — to having an acceptable AP score on your record.

If you're wondering how else you can get ahead on the college application process, The Princeton Review's admissions counseling can help. And check out our books The Best 385 Colleges and The Complete Book of Colleges to help determine which schools you'll target.

This article originally appeared in June 2019

More Questions? AP Exam Prep Tips to Share?

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Rob Franek

Rob Franek

College Admissions and Test Prep Expert

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