ic S/general/checkmark circled Thanks for subscribing! Be on the lookout for our next newsletter.
ic S/general/checkmark circled Saved to Favorites.
Articles / Applying to College / California In-State Tuition Using Grandparents' Address?

California In-State Tuition Using Grandparents' Address?

Sally Rubenstone
Written by Sally Rubenstone | Nov. 19, 2008

Question: I plan on applying to a California State university and I have grandparents living in California. I would like to use their address to apply as it would lower my tuition costs, but I currently live in Colorado. Will I be able to use my grandparents address in my application?

Definitely NOT!! Half of the high school students in the US would be heading to the Left Coast to bunk with Grandma or Grandpa, Aunt Edna or Uncle Earl, if the enticing (and outstanding) California colleges and universities allowed applicants to use their relatives' addresses ... or didn't check carefully when applicant and high school zip codes are miles apart.


Here is a summary of CA residency requirements for tuition purposes:

To be considered a California resident for purposes of fees, an out-of-state student must have lived in California for more than one year preceding the residence determination date, relinquish residence in other states, show an intent to establish residency in California and demonstrate financial independence. Unmarried undergraduates from other states qualify as financially independent if they were not claimed by their parents or others as dependents for tax purposes for two preceding tax years and if their annual income is sufficient to meet their needs.

So, in order to attend a CA school as a resident, you would have to move in with your grandparents (or elsewhere in the Golden State) for two years for a purpose other than attending school. (Although there is officially only a one-year residency requirement, it takes two years for most students who have been named as dependents on parental tax forms through high school.) In other words, you would have to get a job and not only earn wages in CA but also be able to prove that you are self-supporting and no longer financially linked to your parents in Colorado. They couldn't declare you as a dependent on their taxes; you would have to change your driver's license (if you have one), your library card, and any other documentation that connects you to your current home.

I know it can be frustrating to pay high out-of-state tuition when one has ties to that state, but the rules are very strict and carefully scrutinized to protect the true residents. So I'm afraid you'll have to rethink your plan.

Written by

Sally Rubenstone

Sally Rubenstone

Sally Rubenstone knows the competitive and often convoluted college admission process inside out: From the first time the topic of college comes up at the dinner table until the last duffel bag is unloaded on a dorm room floor. She is the co-author of Panicked Parents' Guide to College Admissions; The Transfer Student's Guide to Changing Colleges and The International Student's Guide to Going to College in America. Sally has appeared on NBC's Today program and has been quoted in countless publications, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Weekend, USA Today, U.S. News & World Report, Newsweek, People and Seventeen. Sally has viewed the admissions world from many angles: As a Smith College admission counselor for 15 years, an independent college counselor serving students from a wide range of backgrounds and the author of College Confidential's "Ask the Dean" column. She also taught language arts, social studies, study skills and test preparation in 10 schools, including American international schools in London, Paris, Geneva, Athens and Tel Aviv. As senior advisor to College Confidential since 2002, Sally has helped hundreds of students and parents navigate the college admissions maze. In 2008, she co-founded College Karma, a private college consulting firm, with her College Confidential colleague Dave Berry, and she continues to serve as a College Confidential advisor. Sally and her husband, Chris Petrides, became first-time parents in 1997 at the ripe-old age of 45. So Sally was nearly an official senior citizen when her son Jack began the college selection process, and when she was finally able to practice what she had preached for more than three decades.

More on Applying to College

See all
pexels-ketut-subiyanto-4560150

What are College Likely Letters and How Do You Get One?

In the U.S. college system, "Likely Letters" are excellent news for the select few who receive them. Colleges don'…

Copy of Articles & Guidance

Tips for Applying to College as a Trans Student

Choosing where to apply and applying to college is hard enough, but when you’re trans, non-binary, genderfluid, or genderqueer, t…

Header

5 Reasons to Fall in Love With Quinnipiac

Between the Mount Carmel Campus, York Hill Campus and North Haven Campus, Quinnipiac offers something for everyone. It’s no wonde…

How to Transfer to a New College: A 5-Step Plan

How to Transfer to a New College: A 5-Step Plan

It happens from time to time – you've started college, but you realize that perhaps your university wasn't the best cho…

Student in bed on computer in dimly room

Which of Two (Opposite) Colleges Should I Choose?

Question: I'm trying to decide between 2 schools that at first seem very similar: Both are small, private liberal arts colle…

Ace the SAT in Just 10 Minutes a Day!

Discover how you can make your college journey easier.

Get Started
Need Help Paying for College?
VIew Offers