Ivy League

Ivy League GPA Requirememnts

If you are about to enter your junior year with a C average, unless you do something relatively spectacular in the next year and a half of school, it's unlikely that you could get into an Ivy. Other aspects that could help--but not guarantee--that you might get in would include extreme athletic accomplishments (national-level championships), musical abilities (semi-professional-level talent), minority considerations, and strong legacy connections.

Ivy Transfer Chances

The challenge you face is knowing ahead of time which courses (and for that matter, the entire curriculum at your current school) are transferrable to any other college, let alone an Ivy League school. And then finding out what characteristics of the Ivy League school match the level of preparedness you have achieved.

Quality of Boarding Schools

Private schools vary in quality just like public schools. Some public schools will offer you a premium education that can prepare you for the Ivy League and other so-called "elite" colleges. Likewise, some privates will vastly outperform many publics. You'll have to investigate on a school-by-school basis.

What Constitutes “Ivy League”?

The designation "Ivy League" first appeared at the typewriter of Caswell Adams of the New York Tribune in 1937. The tag, premature of any formal agreement, was immediately adopted by the press as a foreshadowing of an eastern football league which, at the time, was big news to everyone except the athletic directors involved.

Chances at HYP?

The weakest link in the chain for most applicants, in my view, is the essay. Most seniors just don't know how to find their writing voice, let alone use it to elaborate who they are to the admissions committee.

SATs and ECs for Ivies

Most Ivy applicants have SAT I scores in the mid-to-high 1400s and above. Their SAT IIs are usually in the high 600s to mid-700s.

How Do Ivies View Extracurriculars?

As far as ECs go, you need to show dedicated excellence to a few significant efforts, not a big menu of thinly spread involvements. If you're involved in some quality volunteer endeavors, that would be good. Quite frankly, though, you need to have more than "a little" involvement. The Ivies look for longer-term activity in a few "meaty" things...

Book Review: America’s Elite Colleges

America’s Elite Colleges: The Smart Applicant’s Guide to the Ivy League and Other Top Schools co-authored by Dave Berry Paperback – 352 pages, Random House, 2001 This book is a cut above those with similar titles… some of the best advice I’ve read recently about how to get into an Ivy League or other elite ...

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Optional Update Form For An Ivy Application

This form is provided so that you can file the initial parts of your application in a timely manner (the earlier the better) without being concerned that you won’t have an opportunity to catch us up on what you have been doing during the first half of your senior year. Feel free to use all ...

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Ivy Success Diary: From Nowhere To New Haven

For those of you who may think that your family situation, where you live, or who you are severely limits your ability to get into an Ivy League or other so-called elite school, take heart.  Here are some annotated excerpts from the email messages of “Robert” (not his real name), from a small, backwater town ...

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