ic S/general/checkmark circled Thanks for subscribing! Be on the lookout for our next newsletter.
ic S/general/checkmark circled Saved to Favorites.
Articles / Paying for College / In-State Tuition in Texas After Relocation?

In-State Tuition in Texas After Relocation?

Sally Rubenstone
Written by Sally Rubenstone | Sept. 14, 2015

Question: Hello Dean, I hope you can give us some insight/suggestions regarding residency. My husband and I plan to move back “home” to Dallas, Texas, shortly after our son graduates from high school. Our son is currently a high school junior. We live in Ohio (have lived here 10 years now), but won’t likely move prior to his graduation due in large part to the following: Son attends a highly regarded, large public Ohio school, and is very near academic top of very large class. He’s very strong in both academics and extracurricular activities. So my husband and I both plan to keep working in Ohio until our son graduates.

Our BIG question is, how/when can our son get in-state tuition in Texas if we only just move there the summer after his high school graduation?

Your son will not be considered a Texas resident for tuition purposes until you have resided in Texas for 12 consecutive months. And, even then, if he has already enrolled at a Texas public college or university as a non-resident, he will not automatically be granted in-state status at the end of the first year. He will have to apply for it, and the determination is made on a case-by-case basis by the individual schools.  If your intent to remain in Texas is clear (more on that in a minute), then your son’s reclassification is probably just a formality, but you still need to understand that it is not a sure-thing.


Once you relocate to Texas, you shouldn’t plan to move into your sister’s rumpus room and drive around on your Ohio licenses if you want the 12-month clock to start ticking right away. This website from the University of Texas provides a helpful list of things that you need to do to establish your Texas residency, and your year won’t begin without documentation that you have officially launched this process. Note, however, that residency requirements can vary at least a little bit from one public college to the next. So once your son has his eye on some options, you should research the requirements at these schools individually.

If you are fairly certain that your son will attend a public college in Texas, you might want to encourage him to take a “gap year” after he graduates from his high school in Ohio. That way, you wouldn’t get stuck paying a year of out-of-state tuition in TX, and your son wouldn’t have to petition for reclassification after starting college. Since many students opt to take a gap year anyway, even without this big incentive, this could be a wise strategy for him and … especially… for the parents who will be picking up the tab for his higher education!

 

Written by

Sally Rubenstone

Sally Rubenstone

Sally Rubenstone knows the competitive and often convoluted college admission process inside out: From the first time the topic of college comes up at the dinner table until the last duffel bag is unloaded on a dorm room floor. She is the co-author of Panicked Parents' Guide to College Admissions; The Transfer Student's Guide to Changing Colleges and The International Student's Guide to Going to College in America. Sally has appeared on NBC's Today program and has been quoted in countless publications, including The New York Times, The Washington Post, USA Weekend, USA Today, U.S. News & World Report, Newsweek, People and Seventeen. Sally has viewed the admissions world from many angles: As a Smith College admission counselor for 15 years, an independent college counselor serving students from a wide range of backgrounds and the author of College Confidential's "Ask the Dean" column. She also taught language arts, social studies, study skills and test preparation in 10 schools, including American international schools in London, Paris, Geneva, Athens and Tel Aviv. As senior advisor to College Confidential since 2002, Sally has helped hundreds of students and parents navigate the college admissions maze. In 2008, she co-founded College Karma, a private college consulting firm, with her College Confidential colleague Dave Berry, and she continues to serve as a College Confidential advisor. Sally and her husband, Chris Petrides, became first-time parents in 1997 at the ripe-old age of 45. So Sally was nearly an official senior citizen when her son Jack began the college selection process, and when she was finally able to practice what she had preached for more than three decades.

More on Paying for College

See all
students-walking

Colleges That Offer Tuition Waivers and Scholarships for Native American Students

A state-by-state list of colleges and universities that offer tuition waivers and scholarships for Native American students.

With …

pointing at screen - john-schnobrich

Scholarships for Hispanic/Latinx Students 2022-23

In honor of October being Hispanic / Latinx Heritage month, below is a list of scholarships currently accepting applications that…

529Plans_2

How to Handle 529 Plans in a Volatile Stock Market

Have you looked at your 529 plan recently?

Don’t.

If you do take a look at your 529 plan, you may be shocked at how the value has c…

SmartTRACK

Plan Ahead To Cut Costs For College

We get asked every day by middle and upper-middle income parents if there is anything they can do to make college more affordable…

Harvard_University_Gazette

Harvard to Expand Financial Aid Starting with Class of ’26

Harvard College has offered admission to 1,214 applicants for the Class of 2026, with 1,954 admitted in total, including those se…

Need Help Paying for College?
VIew Offers