Physical disability -- help or hindrance for admissions?





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Discus: What Are My Chances?: February 2003 Archive: Physical disability -- help or hindrance for admissions?
By Clarityblur (Clarityblur) on Saturday, February 22, 2003 - 09:23 pm: Edit

do colleges consider a physical disability as a "diversity" factor in the admissions process?
I have mild cerebral palsy, upper body, right side only (to the extent that I'm completely self-sufficient (i have a driver's license etc)but i can't excel at sports or play musical instruments). Will I be penalized for the lack of sports/musical achievements on my transcript?
I'm hoping to apply to Brown, with 1400 SATS, 9 APs (4/5 scores) EIC & business editor of newspaper, NCET writing finalist, ind. 2nd place state-level science olympiad, Pres. of spanish honor soc, NHS, 6hr/wk tutoring hispanics & working w/ handicapped kids, attended Duke TIP summer program for 4 yrs & published twice in national anthologies.
any insights?

By asfdasdf on Saturday, February 22, 2003 - 09:27 pm: Edit

Ha, another dupe.

They want RACIAL diversity, not diversity.

By r on Saturday, February 22, 2003 - 09:28 pm: Edit

yes you will get in
and the disability will prob help
its really cool that you could do all that with cerebral palsy
good luck

By Austin_Powers on Saturday, February 22, 2003 - 09:37 pm: Edit

I'm kind of curious on this subject. Wonder what an admissions officer's perspective would be.....

By disgusted on Saturday, February 22, 2003 - 10:41 pm: Edit

I also have cerebral palsy, but I can play an instrument. However, my writing is illegible, I walk with a limp, I have a slight hearing problem, and I have trouble with word retrieval. I am in all AP classes, and my IQ is over 150. I go to PT 4x a week, OT 3x a week, and speech 1x a week. I am also in a special gym class. If the colleges want to put up with me, I'll be one of the best students they ever had. Trouble is, will they want to put up with me? I hardly consider my disability an easy admission ticket.Don't give up- be the best you can be, and go to a school where you will feel comfortable and educated. Good luck-the future is as bright as you make it

By Austin_Powers on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 03:00 pm: Edit

I know that officers simply would not ignore a disability, since something like that would stand out on an application. The question is, would they be excited about your triumph over adversity and admit you, or turned off by your disability and reject you. What are the opinions of everybody out there?

By I.Q. 164 on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 03:19 pm: Edit

I.Q.,...ha! I.Q.'s are like ••••• measurements; rarely are they spoken of with honesty in mind.

By NYLawyer on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 03:24 pm: Edit

A physical disability will give you an edge in the admissions process. It is not simply a matter of diversity. Colleges are under pressure to show they are in compliance with the ADA. The only way to prove compliance is to show they are admitting disabled students. Thus, a well-qualified student with a physical disability will be much in demand. In my opinion, it's a well-deserved edge in light of the obstacles many have faced. So good luck to you all.

By Incognito (Incognito) on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 03:27 pm: Edit

To "I.Q. 164"....

"I.Q.,...ha! I.Q.'s are like measurements; rarely are they spoken of with honesty in mind."
****Can you please elaborate?...

By I.Q. 164 on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 03:56 pm: Edit

To Incognito,

'Reification' is the treatment of an abstraction as a concrete or material thing. One does not "have" an I.Q. of 150. One obtains an I.Q. score of 150 on a specific test under specific conditions. For example, I could raise my reificated (and fallacious) I.Q. score by taking the Cattel Culture Fair III. Since this test has a standard deviation of 24 points, as opposed to the 15 point S.D. of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS), scoring three deviations above the norm would "give" me an I.Q. of 172 (24 x 3 = 72 + 100 = 172), as opposed to 3 S.D.'s above the norm on the Wechsler, or 145 (15 x 3 = 45 + 100 = 145). Since the type of test and the context are always omitted when promulgating I.Q. scores, people can essentially manufacture an inflated I.Q. by taking different tests under different conditions (such as when they were children, since factoring in age greatly inflates the score). Furthermore, the glut of online I.Q. tests are innaccurate, which furthers the conceit of many who take these tests with the false notion that the tests are even close to being reliable. I have studied psychometrics for some time, and it is almost laughable to hear some of the things that people say about I.Q.

By I.Q. 164 on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 04:19 pm: Edit

Incognito, I am going to present a conclusion that I have drawn from reading 3 or 4 of your posts, and you tell me how accurate the conclusion is. I will present my conclusion, and then the premises I used.

Conclusion: You are concerned with I.Q., because it reflects one's mental capacities to an extent. You think that I.Q. is important, not just in itself, but also for personal worth. In addition, you find the topic interesting. At one time or another, you may have typed "I.Q." into a search engine, or "I.Q. SAT," or "I.Q. SAT 1600 800" and perused the results.

Premise 1: The SAT is, in your eyes, a type of intelligence test. Because of some unmentioned element of your past, you are very concerned with attaining a perfect score.

Premise 2: You desire someone to reveal a certain level of insight behind the SAT-I.Q. controversy.

I could be totally wrong. Let me know.

By bump on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 06:37 pm: Edit

bump-a-roonie

By disgusted on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 07:02 pm: Edit

All I know is that the school district tested me with the WISC when I was in 3rd grade for the gifted program. They told me that my IQ was 150. I was only stating a fact. For all I know maybe it dropped to 5! What is the big deal? I was only trying to show that one should not judge a book by it's cover.If they would have told me it was 100, that would have been ok, but they didn't, and I was one of 20 kids out of 700 to make the gifted program at our school. I was trying to show that with even all that behind me, I do not believe the colleges are running to grab me. You can not tell I am disabled by looking at me, but I can only imagine what they are thinking when they read all the accommodations that I need. "sigh"

By j on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 07:06 pm: Edit

They don't care about the accommodations that you need. They just care about your stats. They don't even know what accommodations you will need until you get accepted, so don't worry.

By Drusba (Drusba) on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 07:08 pm: Edit

NYLawyer is correct. The disability, virtually everywhere, will actually be an advantage adding to the original poster's otherwise stellar credentials.

By sauce on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 07:24 pm: Edit

Disgusted, if you don't want colleges to accept you based on your disability, then don't mention your disability in your application. If you need accomodations, you can tell them once you get there. I am referring to disability and accommodations as two separate things here, just to make that clear.

By Austin_Powers (Austin_Powers) on Monday, February 24, 2003 - 11:36 pm: Edit

Do private colleges have to follow the ADA, because I know the Ivy's application review policies are not subject to review because they dont take gov't money.

By Austin_Powers (Austin_Powers) on Tuesday, February 25, 2003 - 08:54 pm: Edit

bump

By Incognito (Incognito) on Tuesday, February 25, 2003 - 09:15 pm: Edit

In response to "I.Q. 164"

I must say that I am very impressed with your logical input on the forum. I know very little about IQ tests. I appreciate your response to my request. I can tell that you are a person who has been reading my material on these forums for a very long time. I think that you may have even chatted w/me under a different alias (and if so, then who were you? I'm just curious).

Here are some of my responses:

"You are concerned with I.Q., because it reflects one's mental capacities to an extent."
****To be completely honest, I really dont know much about IQ at all. I am not too sure about what it means, and what it signifies. However, like any typical naive teen who may find him/herself thinking about these things, I began to make assumptions on the basis of what I've heard. One thing is that I've heard it measures "pattern recognition" (although I am not saying that it does -- I simply dont know). I am concerned about IQ because I think that it does represent one's mental abilities to a very large extent. For me, personally, I feel that my mental abilities (or lack thereof) are extremely important. I feel very strongly about that. (This does not, however, mean that I devalue those who are "dumb").

"You think that I.Q. is important, not just in itself, but also for personal worth."
****WOW! I dont know who you are, but you are really good! I was actually thinking pretty much the same thing before I read that. You took the words right out of my mouth.

"In addition, you find the topic interesting."
****Well, yeah, especially when we consider the correlation (or lack thereof) between intelligence and one's genes.

"At one time or another, you may have typed "I.Q." into a search engine, or "I.Q. SAT," or "I.Q. SAT 1600 800" and perused the results."
****No, I have not done so yet. One of the reasons is because I am too afraid of what I may find. If, for example, a source tells me that there is a direct link between IQ and and SAT score, and I fail to acheive a good SAT score, I would be led to beleive that mey IQ is low. Therefor, I would realize that (what I consider to be) my most important attribute is worthless.

"The SAT is, in your eyes, a type of intelligence test."
****Well, basically, yes. Although that is MY personal assumption, and it could certainly be fallacious. I have tried to do a little bit of research on it, but really not much. I even created a forum on this site a while ago called "Does the SAT measure IQ?" Based on what you've said to me (your conclusions) I would guess that you have already read it.

"Because of some unmentioned element of your past, you are very concerned with attaining a perfect score."
****Yes. I am not trying to hide anything. Its just a very long story.

"You desire someone to reveal a certain level of insight behind the SAT-I.Q. controversy."
****Well, yes. HOWEVER, having said that, I am a little cautious about questioning people, because I fear certain responses.


I am not very sure as to why you really care about my assumptions. I guess you're just curious. Its respectable enough. You are right about your conclusions. Feel free to respond if you like. If I do not respond to any posts in a day or two, just bump the forum.

By Incognito (Incognito) on Tuesday, February 25, 2003 - 09:17 pm: Edit

Oh, by the way, "I.Q. 164"....
Do you beleive that one's IQ is genetic? Just curious....

By Incognito (Incognito) on Tuesday, February 25, 2003 - 09:24 pm: Edit

To Clarityblur:

I do not think that colleges will reject you or look down upon you due to a disability. If anything, they will regard you highly for succeeding despite adverse conditions. You should applaud yourself, and I think that colleges will do the same. I actually have a minor physical disability. I wish you the best of luck in college admissions.

By Nymom (Nymom) on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 - 07:43 am: Edit

To Austin Powers --

Private colleges are subject to the ADA because they are "places of public accommodation." ADA jurisdiction is not dependent on the receipt of government funds.

By Austin_Powers (Austin_Powers) on Wednesday, February 26, 2003 - 09:03 pm: Edit

Oh, I see. Does that mean private colleges are more likely to admit a disabled student? (Especially in the case of super-selectives like Harvard and Yale)

By Austin_Powers (Austin_Powers) on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 07:54 pm: Edit

Bump a doodle do

By Drusba (Drusba) on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 10:36 pm: Edit

The ADA covers private colleges. Also, the ivies take huge amounts of governement funding -- for example, federally guaranteed loans, research grants from the National Science Foundation. The ADA does not create a right of those with disabilities to be given preferential treatment in admission to college but does require that they not be discrimnated against (and receive necessary aids --like ramps instead of stairs, aids for the blind etc.) Colleges as a whole, including HYP, both to show they are complying with the ADA and because it is extremely good public relations, will give some preferential treatment to admitting a student with disabilities.

By Austin_Powers (Austin_Powers) on Friday, February 28, 2003 - 11:29 pm: Edit

Ah, i see. Well, if everything Drusba said is completely true, then my question is answered. Thanks a lot.


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