I'm a competitive swimmer with decent SAT scores and grades,





Click here to go to the NEW College Discussion Forum

Discus: What Are My Chances?: January 2004 Archive: I'm a competitive swimmer with decent SAT scores and grades,
By Imfrikinstemmy (Imfrikinstemmy) on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 07:06 pm: Edit

Hi! Ok, this is my first time writing a new conversation, but here it goes!

I'm a competitive USS swimmer and I swim 22 hours a week for 48 weeks. I was a member of 2 national record breaking relays in the 400 meter free and 800 meter free reays. I also have 3 junior national cuts and I am really close to making my senior cuts. I would be in the faster half of Ivy swim teams, but for schools like Stanford, UCLA, and Cal I would be in the bottom middle.

I am also a guidance counselor at an international adoption agency (Cathwell Adoption Agency whose main headquarters are in Taipei, Taiwan). I contribute 4 hours a week for 40 weeks there. I help adoptees overcome their insecurities about being adopted and the Asian community's stigma of adoption.

My SAT score was a 1410, V740 M670. My GPA weighted is a 3.9. Last year, I took AP Biology, AP US history, honors english, honors spanish, and precalculus. I scored a 5 on my AP Bio test and a 4 on AP US History test. For SAT IIs, my writing score was 730, my math IC was 630 (yea, I'm working on that, I'm going to take it again in January), and my Biology score was 720. I've only taken each test once, if that is any factor.

As of now, I'm applying to 8 schools: Harvard, Stanford, UCLA, Cal, Michigan-Ann Arbor, Notre Dame, Brown, and maybe even USC. What are my chances for getting into any one of these schools? I applied early to Harvard and got deferred. The coach told me that it was possibly because I'm from California and/or because I'm an athlete. So let me know! Thanks!!

By Mjl86 (Mjl86) on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 07:09 pm: Edit

Why Brown or USC? aren't those anti-sport and ultra liberal schools?

By Daggerlee (Daggerlee) on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 07:18 pm: Edit

If Harvard really wanted you for their swim team, I think they would have accepted you. On the other hand, maybe you were a good fit for their swim team, but they just want to wait for Regular Action to see if there are any better swimmers applying; and if there aren't; well you're in.

By Imfrikinstemmy (Imfrikinstemmy) on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 07:27 pm: Edit

Well, actually, USC has one of the best swim programs in the nation. Meanwhile, Brown has an okay swim program. I'm mostly applying there because it has a pretty good balance of academics and swimming. However, it's not my top choice.

By Libsters (Libsters) on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 08:52 pm: Edit

Do you have a real safety school in case you just happen to have bad luck and get rejected from all of these schools?!?! You really should! And also, are you a recruited athlete? Or do you just swim and are really good at it, but not being recruited?

By Imfrikinstemmy (Imfrikinstemmy) on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 09:41 pm: Edit

I was recruited by Harvard, Columbia, and UCLA. However, I havent' contacted some of the coaches like Brown, USC, or Michigan because I didn't realize that I wanted to go there until recently. My backup schools are UC Davis and UC Santa Barbara

By Bobmcc (Bobmcc) on Wednesday, December 31, 2003 - 10:43 pm: Edit

Kenyon - good academics and, actually, a very good swimming school.

By Ivysearch (Ivysearch) on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 08:53 am: Edit

What are your events and swim times? I am also a swimmer trying to get into Ivy League schools. My academic statistics are very similar to yours. I thought this would be easier than it's been.

By Ivysearch (Ivysearch) on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 09:26 am: Edit

I know a swimmer who was accepted Early Action at Harvard with 1200 SAT, no APs and average grades. I think the coach did not put you high enough on her list.

By Jamimom (Jamimom) on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 05:34 pm: Edit

Getting accepted as an athletic recruit is not a cakewalk particularly in a nonpriority sport like swimming. You never know who else is applying with better times than yours. I have worked with several swimmers, and though you can see what strokes the team will be needing by checking the college swim websites and by comparing best times, you never know who else the coach is talking to.
You sound like you have a good start on the process. You should send a copy of your application, transcript and test scores to the swim coach--unofficial copies are fine. It should go out with a cover letter giving your times and events and your highschool and USS coaches' names, phone numbers, addresses, e-mails. You should also ask for a reference letter from these coaches and give them an addressed stamped envelope to mail to all these college coaches. You may even want to call the college coach and/or e-mail him and let him know you have sent him this packet and that you really want to be part of his team. Tell him you would love to come for an official visit.
The next step comes from the college coaches as they assess their needs and look at their pool of prospects. If you don't hear from them, they don't need you. It's really quite cut and dry.
As with all college prospects, you should have a range of selectivities in the schools you choose. And the more interested in swimming the school is, the better your chances. Look for top D-3 schools as well as the D1 schools. I believe the top ones are Kenyon, Hopkins, Emory, CMU, Denison, Washington U. They are always looking for swimmers. When I lived in Baltimore and Pittsburgh, the coaches at Hopkins and CMU were quite aggressive in recruiting and did have clout with admissions.
The problem is that it is hard to determine which coaches have any say in admissions and which ones are even interested in recruiting. For instance, Georgetown does very little in this area, and just takes what swimmers it gets from the general pool of applicants.
Also talk to your highschool and USS coaches. They know a lot of college coaches and may be able to make contact for you. Or some older swimmers who are now in college. If they put in a word to their coach that you are interested and would fit in well with the team, that can make a bit of difference.
I believe being from California would be of slight advantage for east coast schools, not a detriment. I know a young man with times similar to yours (Junior cuts) who is from the east coast and was turned down from Williams ED1, Bowdoin ED2, but was accepted to Pomona where he swims today. I also know another young man from the midwest swimming for Columbia with times like yours and an academic profile not as impressive. However all of the Harvard swim kids I know have really high academic stats as well as excellent times. One young man I know who swims there has national times but also was a top drawer academic candidate--1580 SAT1s, and top 3 in his class from a well known prep school. If you look at the team roster, you will see that many of these kids come from prep schools where the academics are extremely rigorous. Many who are on the team already and in the bottom half in swim stats did not get in with the swimming but are walk ons. The Harvard coach gets only a few picks at a range of SAT scores, and he takes only the top swimmers with the events he needs the most. Good luck to you.

By Collegehelp1234 (Collegehelp1234) on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 06:10 pm: Edit

What are you TALKING about, Mjl86. Brown is an excellent school for swimming. Besides, I don't see any super-conservative tendencies in the poster's bio.

You have an excellent chance of each of those schools. I personally know a Brown swimming recruit (who actually turned down his acceptance because he wanted to attend a UC for a year so that he could stick around in his hometown). Good luck.

By Collegehelp1234 (Collegehelp1234) on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 06:11 pm: Edit

What are you TALKING about, Mjl86. Brown is an excellent school for swimming. Besides, I don't see any super-conservative tendencies in the poster's bio.

You have an excellent chance of each of those schools. I personally know a Brown swimming recruit (who actually turned down his acceptance because he wanted to attend a UC for a year so that he could stick around in his hometown. His parents were devestated lol). Good luck.

By Imfrikinstemmy (Imfrikinstemmy) on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 08:05 pm: Edit

I'm mostly a sprinter. My best events are the 50, 100, and 200 free and the 100 fly and my backstroke is ok. My 50 yard free (not the best of my swim events) is a :24.6. My 100 yard free is a :52.8 but I'm better at the 100 meter free which is a :59.23. My 200 free is a 1:53.6 but I'm REALLY hoping that I get my senior cut within the next month. My 100 Fly is a :58.3 and my 100 back is a :59.8. I know my times aren't super fast, but I mean, they're decent, ya know?

By Ivysearch (Ivysearch) on Monday, January 05, 2004 - 09:11 am: Edit

I am shocked that you did not get in to Harvard. The girl I know that got in is at a similar swimming level to you but different events. She does not compare to you academically though. I have to assume the coach had faster swimmers than you in your particular events.

By Ivysearch (Ivysearch) on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 05:05 pm: Edit

She's a breaststroker/ freestyler. I think she has a 50 free 24.5. and her breast is around a 1:05/2:23.

By Usna_Reject (Usna_Reject) on Tuesday, January 06, 2004 - 05:21 pm: Edit

I would strongly suggest the naval academy but you probably wouldn't be interested
if only i had your resume, heh
blah


Report an offensive message on this page    E-mail this page to a friend
Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.

Administrator's Control Panel -- Board Moderators Only
Administer Page