St. Johns





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Discus: What Are My Chances?: December 2002 Archive: St. Johns
By sleeperschools on Tuesday, December 17, 2002 - 12:39 am: Edit

Hello everyone, I just visited St. John's website and found the whole school pretty intriguing.

I was wondering if anyone knew a student there?

What has been said about the school?

What kind of
critera does one need to transfer there?

By Pat57575 (Pat57575) on Tuesday, December 17, 2002 - 12:53 am: Edit

St John's MN? My mom went to St. Ben's... she enjoyed it a lot.

By sleeperschools on Tuesday, December 17, 2002 - 01:01 am: Edit

No,St. John's in Maryland. Program is built around "great books" curriculum. This is the type of program I've dreamed about.

By ihatenazis on Tuesday, December 17, 2002 - 01:12 am: Edit

the whole notion of "great books" is facistic.

By the.me on Tuesday, December 17, 2002 - 05:20 pm: Edit

I visited the place because I thought it looked fantastic, and well, let's just say it's better on paper than it is when you spend a weekend there. Many of the teachers don't actually know the material that they're teaching, they're kind of counting on you to figure it out for yourself along with them.

Let's face it, you could get that education for free at a library. What you can't get for free is experiences instructors who really know what they're talking about.

But if you check it out and like it, then that's great too. I have a very close friend who is applying there, and she visited too -- and loved it.

By sleeperschools on Wednesday, December 18, 2002 - 12:51 am: Edit

Do you know of any other college similar to it? I would love to go to that school, but 30k is much out of my price range. Perhaps a school around 17k, with the same teaching style.

By Liz (Liz) on Wednesday, December 18, 2002 - 04:36 pm: Edit

I don't know if Reed's less expensive, but it's sort of the same. Thomas Aquinas also has the great books program.

By sleeperschools on Wednesday, December 18, 2002 - 08:28 pm: Edit

Are there two different Reeds? If so, which one are you talking about. Thanks.

By yulsie on Sunday, December 22, 2002 - 02:10 pm: Edit

Hi, I attended St. John's college in Annapolis and would be happy to answer questions. It is in a class by itself, the only fully integrated program in existence. Not for everyone, hence the high admit rate - students self-select for four years of ivory tower heaven.

By randomcomment on Sunday, December 22, 2002 - 02:31 pm: Edit

ihatenazis- facistic isn't a word. facist is the word you should have used. Sorry to be petty, just thought someone who hates nazis should know.

By sleeperschools on Sunday, December 22, 2002 - 03:40 pm: Edit

yulsie, What type of math do you study at St. John's?

By Yulsie on Sunday, December 22, 2002 - 06:26 pm: Edit

Hi sleeperschools,

Like a typical Johnnie, I am compelled to 'set a context' for my remarks:

Although I think that St. John's is an incredible environment for any individual who: 1) is not immediately focused on a particular career 2) is sincerely comitted to mastering the foundations of Western civilization through its founding philosophies, literature, history, and scientific discoveries 3) has a thick skin about meeting past lovers in the dining hall every morning (small place, can't hide!), I left after the sophomore year, primarily because of the math.

The first year of math is Euclid - day after day of Euclidian proofs in a small tutorial class. The second year is Ptolemy - which amounted to day after day of proving that succeeding levels and permutations of 'regular circular motion' explain orbital anomalies of the sun's rotation around the earth. If you have an innate appreciation of mathematical systems and their internally cohesive beauties, you will be thrilled. Personally, I couldn't force myself to enjoy it.

For me, seminar was the highlight of the program -fell in love with philosophy and went on to further study for five more years. A pretty high percentage of St. John's students go to graduate school. Humanities graduate programs and law schools really appreciate these students for their well-developed reasoning powers and analytical skills. For medical school or other disciplines requiring a strong math and science preparation, it is necessary to take additional courses. IMO, future scientists and anyone with a technical bent (e.g., geology, computer science) shouldn't consider St. John's, unless they have the will, time, and financial resources to be in school for a loooonnnnnngggg while.

Becoming a Johnnie is like marriage to The Liberal Arts in the purest sense. If you discover that you are not equally dedicated to all areas of the program, you divorce. However, it does an incredible job of producing individuals who are confident in their ability to pursue any line of inquiry, who can develop cogent arguments to support their position, and who tend to lie to themselves a bit less than the average Joe or Jane. It's that Platonic axiom - "the unexamined life is not worth living" - it sticks! :)

By sleeperschools on Sunday, December 22, 2002 - 07:25 pm: Edit

"The first year of math is Euclid - day after day of Euclidian proofs in a small tutorial class. The second year is Ptolemy - which amounted to day after day of proving that succeeding levels and permutations of 'regular circular motion' explain orbital anomalies of the sun's rotation around the. "

I don't do well in math at all. I mean I'm having a time in Pre-Calculus, like D's. How on God's green earth would I past a class of this nature? I'm just no math-science orientented. On the other hand I enjoy Greek Lit, and had a ball reading Oedipus Rex. I've really have taken a liking to this school, because of it untradional methods of teaching. I also like it because it seems to be a good program for future law students, but I must say, I find the math startling. I mean, I never even heard of these types of math. Can some math geniuses please break it down for me?

By sleeperschools on Sunday, December 22, 2002 - 08:54 pm: Edit

Is Euclid- like regular math, where as you solve problems, or is it like the "study" of math?

By Gliasociety (Gliasociety) on Sunday, December 22, 2002 - 11:37 pm: Edit

randomcomment,

"Facist" isn't a word. "Fascist" is the word you should have used. Sorry to be petty, just thought someone who hates errancy should know.

By bump on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 - 03:50 pm: Edit

bump

By Dumbuket (Dumbuket) on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 - 05:23 pm: Edit

Just what we need: a school pumping out batch after batch of self-proclaimed philosophers, too busy "self-actualizing" and discussing the merits of monism over dualism to produce anything of value to society. If you ask me, the classical education is a relic of the past, and people should learn something practical in a university that they enjoy but can put to a use. If you want to study philosophy or some junk, go to a library and learn it yourself. Or join a discussion group.

Just obligated to state the opinion of the "unwashed masses"

By The Graduate on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 - 05:28 pm: Edit

I agree with Dumbuket. Sleeperschools, the math that St. John's teaches is EXTREMELY EASY. Do you know what Euclidean geometry is? This is a circle, this is a square, this is a pair of parallel lines, etc. St. John's shortchanges any and all people who want to do science because the profs there are stuck in the ivory tower and not in the real world. Today, no one gets a Ph.D. in Euclidean geometry; that's for little kids.

In conclusion, go to St. John's if you want to learn about dead, white Europeans and nothing about the real-world.

By sleeperschools on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 - 05:58 pm: Edit

Dumbuket, What do you think of St. John's, as far as prep for law school? The whole law school method of teaching is based on one of the greatest philosphers ever. The Graduate, I didn't know what Euclidean geometry is, thats what I was asking.

By bump on Tuesday, December 24, 2002 - 08:46 pm: Edit

bump..

By bump on Wednesday, December 25, 2002 - 01:12 pm: Edit

bump

By bump on Friday, December 27, 2002 - 05:03 pm: Edit

Bump.

By sleeperschools on Monday, December 30, 2002 - 08:57 pm: Edit

BUMP

By Lki (Lki) on Saturday, October 18, 2003 - 03:31 pm: Edit

bump

By Lki (Lki) on Wednesday, December 03, 2003 - 08:42 pm: Edit

i would like to point out that st. johns is #8 for producing math and compsci phds


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