LIT TEST





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Discus: What Are My Chances?: December 2002 Archive: LIT TEST
By XZSD on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 07:39 am: Edit

I just gave the LIT test this morning. This the prose passage about some kind of 'falling hat' is really REALLY gnawing on me--what was that all about?? Tell me... I NEED TO KNOW! Dammit.... I really screwed the LIT test...This low Lit score will most definitely undermine my 790 SAT I verbal score. I'm contemplating retaking the test in January. I don't suppose I can learn to comprehend Literature in little over a month, can I ?

By Richard from FL on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 08:34 am: Edit

Are you international? I hear they have a different version of the test than us US people.

By XZDV on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 08:42 am: Edit

Did American test takers get the same SAT II's as the resst of the world does? "Success can be disastrous"--was that your writing topic?

By XZDV on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 08:44 am: Edit

American testers still have a good three hours till the test starts.... I guess I shouldn't have revealed the topic.

By XZDV on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 08:47 am: Edit

RichFL

After going through some posts on the message board, I know for a fact that different tests aren't administered here in south Asia.

By XZDV on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 08:57 am: Edit

Here are the topics administered in my region.... as my friends remember them:

May-November

There's always a however

Conscience in a greater motivator than greed XXX something some thing some thing

Something about GOOD CHOICED AND BAD CHOICES

By Richard from FL on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 09:03 am: Edit

Well nevermind then, those are the same as in the US. I know the SAT 1's are different internationally, so i just assumed that the sat 2's would be different as well.

By XZDV on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 09:59 am: Edit

My question: I just gave the LIT test this morning. This the prose passage about some kind of 'falling hat' is really REALLY gnawing on me--what was that all about?? Tell me... I NEED TO KNOW! Dammit.... I really screwed the LIT test...This low Lit score will most definitely undermine my 790 SAT I verbal score. I'm contemplating retaking the test in January. I don't suppose I can learn to comprehend Literature in little over a month, can I ?

By . on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 02:48 pm: Edit

bump

By Brian on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 06:18 pm: Edit

I got the success essay topic too. I just agreed with this statement, and proved it with the examples of Deion Sanders and Galileo Galilei. I kinda felt as though I were writing their bios more than writing about success... did I screw up..

By . on Saturday, December 07, 2002 - 11:07 pm: Edit

bump

By dont worry on Sunday, December 08, 2002 - 12:02 am: Edit

XZDV,
I know what you mean about the 'falling hat' passage. I'm not sure I interpreted it correctly, but I thought it dealt with eloquence and how those who try to speak eloquently often lose their audience; sometimes simple gestures (thus the falling hat) are most effective. I found the poem about the flower and the flame to be somewhat convoluted and hard to decipher. Did you understand it?
As for comprehending literature, I'm sure you did better on the test than you think. I seriously thought I completely failed the AP Lit test last year, which was really similar to the SAT II, and I did fine. Don't worry!

By XZDV on Sunday, December 08, 2002 - 02:24 am: Edit

Thanks for the encouraging words. The questions on yesterdays test seemed more difficult than those in the Barons test papers, which is strange because Barons publications are characteristically more difficult than the real thing.

I'm not sure which poem you're talking about-- the poem about the jilted lover, perhaps?

By literature on Sunday, December 08, 2002 - 12:23 pm: Edit

Yeah, did you understand that one?
I agree, the actual Lit test was harder than the practice tests. I think part of my problem was that I had already read many of the practice excerpts, but was unfamiliar with all the ones on the actual test. The prose passages were easier for me to understand than the poetry.
What other tests did you take yesterday? I took writing (duh) and Spanish. They were both MUCH easier than the literature test.

By XZDV on Sunday, December 08, 2002 - 01:22 pm: Edit

I did understand it, but only very vaguely -- it has been two days, and the test is now a haze. People who rely on sheer standardized test instincts tend to do well on the Lit test. My brother, now an undergrad at Columbia, gave the Lit test a few years ago and scored a 740 without having read anything in his entire school career that would classify, even remotely, as Literature. To this day he can't figure out how he managed a respectable score; he swares he didn't understand a word on the test.

I gave LIT & Writing.

Since yesterday, I've been engaged in the insanely futile activity of recollecting and piecing together the essay I wrote for the test. Here's what I have so far:

"Success can be disastros"
Success can indeed be disastrous. Nirendra Modi --India's Hitler-- endeavored to "ethnically cleanse" India of all Muslims. He succeeded. His success, however, had disastrous consequences for Indian minorities.
For the past fifty years, religious intolerance has been India's greatest problem. The country that gave birth to that great apostle of peace -- Mahatma Gandhi -- has failed to keep faith with his ideals of non-violence and brotherhood. Hindu-Muslim riots recently devastated the Industrial town of Gujarat after a band of Muslim extremists carried out a terrorist attack on a train carrying many Hindu pilgrims. Nirendra Modi saw this as an opportunity; he organized rallies encouraging the Hindu masses to seek retribution. He succeeded?the masses listened to him.In retribution, there was genocide; Muslims were mindlessly slaughtered all over Gujarat while the Modi administration watched in silence.
The rest of India reacted with outrage and disgust at the government-endorsed attempt to "ethnically cleanse" India of the Muslim community. [TWO MORE LINES HERE, DON?T REMEMBER THEM] Thisituation was compared to the Holocaust in Nazi Germany and to the horrors of Bosnia where the murder of innocent people was an instrument of the state. Secular India demanded a UN-sponsored trial for Nirandrea Modi -- much like the trail currently underway at the Hague against former Yugoslav president Soloban Milosevic. Sadly, the UN stayed silent.
As illustrated, one mans personal success led to
disaster and chaos for an entire nation of people. [TWO MORE LINES HERE, DON?T REMEMBER THEM]

By XZDV on Sunday, December 08, 2002 - 01:24 pm: Edit

Success can indeed be disastrous.

Nirendra Modi --India's Hitler-- endeavored to "ethnically cleanse" India of all Muslims. He succeeded. His success, however, had disastrous consequences for Indian minorities.

For the past fifty years, religious intolerance has been India's greatest problem. The country that gave birth to that great apostle of peace -- Mahatma Gandhi -- has failed to keep faith with his ideals of non-violence and brotherhood.

Hindu-Muslim riots recently devastated the Industrial town of Gujarat after a band of Muslim extremists carried out a terrorist attack on a train carrying many Hindu pilgrims. Nirendra Modi saw this as an opportunity; he organized rallies encouraging the Hindu masses to seek retribution. He succeeded?the masses listened to him.In retribution, there was genocide; Muslims were mindlessly slaughtered all over Gujarat while the Modi administration watched in silence.

The rest of India reacted with outrage and disgust at the government-endorsed attempt to "ethnically cleanse" India of the Muslim community. [TWO MORE LINES HERE, DON?T REMEMBER THEM] Thisituation was compared to the Holocaust in Nazi Germany and to the horrors of Bosnia where the murder of innocent people was an instrument of the state. Secular India demanded a UN-sponsored trial for Nirandrea Modi -- much like the trail currently underway at the Hague against former Yugoslav president Soloban Milosevic. Sadly, the UN stayed silent.

As illustrated, one mans personal success led to
disaster and chaos for an entire nation of people. [TWO MORE LINES HERE, DON?T REMEMBER THEM]


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