Do you agree or disagree???





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Discus: SAT/ACT Tests and Test Preparation: July 2004 Archive: Do you agree or disagree???
By Khruschev (Khruschev) on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 04:40 pm: Edit

"The SAT I tests the student's logical abilities through both Mathematics and English verbal usage and comprehension. Then why the hell do I have to memorize the entire English Dictionary just to prove that???"

-Me

By Slipstream99 (Slipstream99) on Sunday, July 25, 2004 - 05:24 pm: Edit

Do I agree with the "The SAT I tests..."? If that's what you are asking, then yes, to a certain extent. There is undoubtedly a requisite of logical reasoning on the SAT, but it also tests familiarity with challenging words, as you lament. It may seem that you have to "memorize the entire English Dictionary," but a background of reading advanced literature should provide all of the vocabulary and critical reading skills necessary to excel.

By Khruschev (Khruschev) on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 08:26 pm: Edit

ok...so when do we use "Semordnilap"???

What I meant by "agree or disagree" was that: Is the test truly only testing logic??? Sorry about the confusion.

By Benzinspeicher (Benzinspeicher) on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 10:36 pm: Edit

i think math only tests logic

By Setzwxman (Setzwxman) on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 10:59 pm: Edit

I have argued this for a while as well. The math part requires little memorization, if any (especially because of the formulas listed at the beginning of the section!), and thus is mostly using logic.

On the contrary, verbal is quite different, IMO. If you don't know what a word means, then most likely you are screwed, unless you can narrow the other choices down somehow. The analogies and sentence completion sections are usually the most challenging/hard, since the questions and answers only contain a few words in them. If you do not know what those words mean, then you are screwed. They can do this in the critical reading section too, but since there are obviously considerably more words there than in the other sections, you have a better chance of excelling in those, IMO. Perhaps this had to do with the new SAT ditching analogies. However, they are still keeping the sentence completion section, and I am sure they will make that as hard as it can be.

By Toblin (Toblin) on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 11:48 pm: Edit

"The SAT I tests the student's logical abilities through both Mathematics and English verbal usage and comprehension. Then why the hell do I have to memorize the entire English Dictionary just to prove that???"

A fine question. The SAT is supposed to test ones "academic aptitude", as the name suggests; and not specific knowledge like the ACT. Good point!

By Vtran31 (Vtran31) on Monday, July 26, 2004 - 11:59 pm: Edit

-SAT math.... logic...ha! just a fewstrategies andshortcuts and u R on yourwayto 800 (and lots of practice till perfection if need be)

-verbal... I guess a lil. I make quite a bit of logic mistakes on there. I still think a few of the CR aretoo darn ambiguious

By Gmf05 (Gmf05) on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 09:29 am: Edit

The reason they use difficult words on the verbal section IS to test logic. There's very little logic involved in an analogy like horse:stable:: etc. Anyone would do perfectly then. Difficult words are used so that you have to reason much more to find the right answer. Knowing a textbook definition does help, but still calls for you to draw conclusions about which is the right answer and why.

Just my opinion anyway.

By Paulhomework (Paulhomework) on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 11:43 am: Edit

if everyone knew what the difficult words meant, then analogies would truly test their logic. However, when you don't know what a word means, no matter how much "logic" you have you're screwed.

By Feuler (Feuler) on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 11:54 am: Edit

I do think that in a sense having the difficult words tests some sort of reasoning because people who reason well will tend to pick up more vocabulary throughout their life. I also agree with what Gmf05 said. However, obviously the problem is that this STILL depends on background, it's just that people better at reasoning tend to make the most of their background. Does that make sense? I kind of think of it in terms of performance = aptitude * background.

Of course, bear in mind that I am using "aptitude" to describe the skills that make people do well on the SAT, which are not necessarily those forms of intelligence useful in life or college- that's a different discussion.

By Vtran31 (Vtran31) on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 12:41 pm: Edit

kaplan hassomenice, cheap strategies thatcan really narrow those questinos down Paul. I postedsome on the analogy topic . course, if u aint takin it agian u won't care ;-P

By Setzwxman (Setzwxman) on Tuesday, July 27, 2004 - 06:40 pm: Edit

If you do not know what a word means, then you cannot reason it out. There is no logic involved if you cannot remember what a certain word means.

By Elizabeth22 (Elizabeth22) on Wednesday, July 28, 2004 - 07:30 am: Edit

Math is almost all logic. There's not really anything you need to have studied to do well, you just need a good set of thinking skills.

Verbal requires logic as well, but also outside knowledge. You can't complete an analogy without logic, but you also can't do it without knowing the words. For Latin students, it really is more of a logic test, since they know many of the roots of the words and can think their way through to coming up with a definition.


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