Short CR Problem!





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Discus: SAT/ACT Tests and Test Preparation: July 2004 Archive: Short CR Problem!
By Ceg (Ceg) on Monday, July 12, 2004 - 05:49 pm: Edit

The invention of the piano was determined by inherent defects in both the clavichord and the harpsichord. The harpsichord did not allow for the execution of dynamics, that is, for playing either loudly or softly, whereas the clavichord allowed a modest range of dynamics but could not generate a tone nearly as loud as that of the harpsichord. A remedy was provided by the Italian harpsichord-maker Bartolommeo Cristofori, who in 1709 built the first hammer-action keyboard instrument. Cristofori called his original instrument the "piano-forte," meaning that it could be played both softly and loudly. An improved model of the pianoforte included an escapement mechanism that "threw" each free-swinging hammer upward at the strings and also a back-check that regulated the hammer''s downward return. An individual damper connected to the action of the hammer was provided for each note.

A later innovation involved the frame. Constant striving for greater sonority had led to the use of very heavy strings, and the point was reached at which the wooden frames of the earlier pianos could no longer withstand the tension. In 1855 the German-born Henry Steinway brought out a grand piano with a cast-iron frame that has served as a model for all subsequent piano frames. Although minor refinements are constantly being introduced, there have been no fundamental changes in the design or construction of pianos since 1855.


The passage suggests that Steinway built the cast-iron frame because it

1. increased the durability of piano

2. could be more easily produced

3. was more adaptable to classic piano design

4. was bound to arouse great popular demand

5. made the piano less bulkly and obtrusive

By Loop123 (Loop123) on Monday, July 12, 2004 - 05:59 pm: Edit

1

The passage explicitly states that the new frames prevent the piano from breaking. This is the same as increasing its durability.

By Legendofmax (Legendofmax) on Monday, July 12, 2004 - 06:22 pm: Edit

1

What Loop said.

"the use of very heavy strings, and the point was reached at which the wooden frames of the earlier pianos could no longer withstand the tension"


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