Getting college credit for AP exams.......





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Discus: SAT/ACT Tests and Test Preparation: May 2004 Archive: Getting college credit for AP exams.......
By Rbc13 (Rbc13) on Tuesday, May 11, 2004 - 09:12 pm: Edit

I have taken 4 this year and I should get at least 20 credits, and at the most 29 credits(I will attend Arizona State University BTW). I figure to take 6 or more AP's next year and get 30 more credits. That adds up to two years of college, and is that really going to affect me if i miss two years of college? Everyone in my family says that college classes aren't that hard if you not going to a prestigious school, and that the classes I'm in now are equal to fresh and soph classes. But will missing out on these courses in college be good or bad for me? Most of the AP exams aren't going to deal with my major except for Calc BC, Stats, Physics maybe, but the rest are just courses that aren't really important to my major. I will major in electrical engineering or some type of math field, and will probably get a full tuition scholarship from ASU. Doing this would allow me to get started on my career early, and the only problem i see is that i will be too young for graduate school, but am I missing something here? Any advice would be appreciated.

By Rbc13 (Rbc13) on Tuesday, May 11, 2004 - 09:16 pm: Edit

The courses would be Spanish, English lang or lit, Stat, APUSH, Phy B, Bio, Amer Gov't, Macro and Micro, Calc BC, If that helps.

By Summoner (Summoner) on Tuesday, May 11, 2004 - 09:28 pm: Edit

you don't get 5 credits for each class. most of the time, it's 3 or 4

By Rbc13 (Rbc13) on Tuesday, May 11, 2004 - 09:41 pm: Edit

Here are ASU's AP credit policies:

1. For the examination in History American or European, a score of 5 or 4 will award the student 6 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of HST 109 and 110 or HST 103 and 104.

2. For the examination in English Language and Composition, a score of 5 or 4 will award the student 6 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of ENG 101 and 114, making the student eligible for ENG 102.

3. For the examination in Statistics, a score of 5 or 4 will award the student 3 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of STP 226

4. For the examination in Spanish Language, a score of 5 will award the student 14 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of SPA 201, 202, 311, and 312.

4. For the examination in Spanish Language, a score of 4 will award the student 11 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of SPA 201, 202, and 311.

5. For the examination in Economics Introductory Macroeconomics, a score of 5 or 4 will award the student 3 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of ECN 111.

6. For the examination in Economics Introductory Microeconomics, a score of 5 or 4 will award the student 3 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of ECN 112.

7.For the examination in English Literature and Composition, a score of 5 or 4 will award the student 6 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of ENG 101 and 204, making the student eligible for ENG 102.

9. For the examination in Mathematics Calculus BC, a score of 5 or 4 will award the student 8 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of MAT 270 and 271.

10. For the examination in Physics B, a score of 5 or 4 will award the student 6 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of PHY 111 and 112.

11. For the examination in Biology, a score of 5 or 4 will award the student 8 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of BIO 181 and 182.

12. For the examination in Political Science American Government and Politics, a score of 5 or 4 will award the student 3 semester hours of credit, which is the equivalent of POS 110.

By Nabo (Nabo) on Tuesday, May 11, 2004 - 09:59 pm: Edit

The AP's do effectively cover the coursework found in college intro courses. Don't feel threatened by passing out of any course in which you received a "5". If there is any doubt in your mind, just check out the course syllabi at college. At least at the college I am attending, I found that I have learned essentially everything in those intro courses in my high school courses. If you are worried about overloading yourself by taking a bunch of upper level courses, just take one less course in your first semester. At least from what I have been told by several college students, most of the upper level courses are not more difficult than intro courses; they merely require a core of knowledge [that you would have picked up in an AP course / intro course].

If you are getting a free ride at college, don't be too eager to graduate in 2 or 3 years. Just take more courses in areas that interest you. Especially as a engineer, this will be a valuable experience. Since most of your coursework is predetermined, your AP's will allow you to make good use of your electives. A broader range of courses in college, which you certainly will experience if you decide to stay the full 4 years, will allow you to become a more attractive candidate for grad schools. But on a more personal level, these college years really are one of your last opportunities to experiment with new ideas and coursework.

yeah, i sorta babbled on. Hope that gives you some direction.

By Rbc13 (Rbc13) on Tuesday, May 11, 2004 - 10:12 pm: Edit

I just thought of something, if I finish all of my required in two years, can I spend the next two years on whatever I want, and would the scholarship still pay for that if it is full tuition?


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