How to study for SAT 2 Writing?





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Discus: SAT/ACT Tests and Test Preparation: April 2004 Archive: How to study for SAT 2 Writing?
By Whtx (Whtx) on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 04:08 pm: Edit

Hi guys,

I'm starting to study by reading some of the prep books but they are so damn boring and some of the grammar stuff confuse me. If I can pick out 95% of the error from just reading the sentence, is there a need to fully understand what the book is saying about prepositional phrases and such?

P.S. Is this sentence right or wrong?
"About a million and a half dollars has been spent on repairing the road to Chatham."

By Kewlkiwi102 (Kewlkiwi102) on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 04:45 pm: Edit

Shouldn't it be "have been spent" because "dollars" is plural?

Oh, and Kaplan's book is really good. When you understand the fundamentals of grammar, you can understand what is wrong about each sentence. Grammar is boring, but not totally useless.

By Whtx (Whtx) on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 04:49 pm: Edit

Shouldn't it be "have been spent" because "dollars" is plural?

That was what I thought but then the Barron's book says the sentence is correct. What the hell?

By Eeeeyor (Eeeeyor) on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 04:56 pm: Edit

it's because the half a million dollars is considered to be spent all as one, not as half a million individual dollars, kinda confusing though

By Kewlkiwi102 (Kewlkiwi102) on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 04:56 pm: Edit

Hm....maybe... b/c it says "A million"?
Oooohhh wait a sec, I get it.
Ok, here goes. You wouldn't say "A hundred dollars ARE a lot of money" you would say "a hundred dollars IS a lot of money."
So maybe when talking about an amount of money, it is considered a single thing?

Any gammar experts out there! Explain please!

By Eeeeyor (Eeeeyor) on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 04:58 pm: Edit

i have a question too, what's the error in this sentence:

The principal was aggravated by the students' deceision to protest during Parents' Weekend.

By Yoyomama04 (Yoyomama04) on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 05:01 pm: Edit

The only thing wrong with that second sentence is the typo in "decision". It's a passive sentence, but not grammatically incorrect.

By Eeeeyor (Eeeeyor) on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 05:03 pm: Edit

oops about the "deceision" thing, but in the prep book it says there is something wrong with "aggravated". do you think the book is wrong??

By Kewlkiwi102 (Kewlkiwi102) on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 06:13 pm: Edit

Ahh! I rememeber this! You cannot aggravate a person, becuase aggravate means "to make worse", you can only aggravate a condition etc. So you would have to use "annoyed". (how you would know that without having seen that specific example, I dunno...).

The book is right. :) Which is that one BTW?
English grammar=totally stupid :)

~Kiwi

By Eeeeyor (Eeeeyor) on Friday, April 09, 2004 - 11:38 pm: Edit

oooo, thanx alot kiwi!!


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