The Political Compass





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Discus: College Confidential Café: 2004 Archive: The Political Compass
By Aspirer42 (Aspirer42) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 06:09 pm: Edit

www.politicalcompass.org

No drag-down inflammatory arguments, please; just the facts (and by facts... I mean scores), ma'am.

Oh, me? (-3.62, -2.41).

By Moojuice (Moojuice) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 07:00 pm: Edit

Yes, political compass rules. I've taken it a few times. Gonna take it again to see where I stand now :P Letcha know how I do! Cheers.

Okay, just took it. Here's where I am:

Economic Left/Right: -9.50
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -7.23

Uhh, wow.

By Aspirer42 (Aspirer42) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 07:32 pm: Edit

...Good evening, Mr. Chomsky. Is there any way that I may be of service? :)

By Tobes (Tobes) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 07:38 pm: Edit

Economic Left/Right: -4.75
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -3.95

That puts me right about where Nelson Mandela and the Dalai Lama are...hmmmm.....

By Emeraldkity4 (Emeraldkity4) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 07:40 pm: Edit

economic left/right -3.75
social libertarian/authoritarian -3.95

By Moojuice (Moojuice) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 08:26 pm: Edit

lol Aspirer42. Don't know what to say really. How 'bout "VIVA LA REVOLUCION!!"?

It's just a test, right? :D

By Eyesclozedtight (Eyesclozedtight) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 08:52 pm: Edit

Economic Left/Right: -4.38
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -4.51

fair enough i suppose. i don't hold a candle to moojuice though!

By Averagemathgeek (Averagemathgeek) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 08:52 pm: Edit

Economic Left/Right: 4.38
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -4.10

By Uknowwho42 (Uknowwho42) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 10:03 pm: Edit

Economic Left/Right: -3.88
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -3.28

By Jlq3d3 (Jlq3d3) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 11:34 pm: Edit

i dont like this test too much. its to simplistic and some questions have different answers for me depending on the conditions and the degree of the questions. It also doesnt allow ppl to skip questions which is bad. Anyway, I call my self a political conservative, and socially libertarian.
Economic Left/Right: 5.75
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 0.51

By Isaman (Isaman) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 11:37 pm: Edit

Hmmm :)

Economic Left/Right: -5.12
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -0.36

By Moojuice (Moojuice) on Sunday, May 16, 2004 - 11:38 pm: Edit

Ahh we meet again. Actually, I think the test is pretty good. It forces you to answer the question and try to comprehend it in your own way. The test actually takes this into account. They mention this in their FAQ, here: http://www.digitalronin.f2s.com/politicalcompass/faq.html

By Massdad (Massdad) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 12:00 am: Edit

I'm right down there with the dali lama myself.

By Ariesathena (Ariesathena) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 12:56 am: Edit

-0.88, -4.51

Check out the composer's section. I'm closest to Mozart.

...and in Massachusetts, I'm a gun-toting conservative!

By Purgeofdoors (Purgeofdoors) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 01:13 am: Edit

4.88
-3.69

And there are no politicians whatsoever in the strange land of the libertarian meritocracy. :)

I do have to wonder about that chart, though... they put Howard Dean and John Kerry on the Authoritarian right.

By Moojuice (Moojuice) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 01:18 am: Edit

Bah, read their FAQ!! Everything's explained there!

By Twinkletoes696 (Twinkletoes696) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 02:02 am: Edit

Economic Left/Right: -5.25
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -3.28

Sweet, I'm like Nelson Mandela!

By Purgeofdoors (Purgeofdoors) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 01:40 pm: Edit

It's a British site, and as they admit in their FAQ, the American political structure is extremely different from the British. American politics tends to be 'centered' due to our non-Parliamentary form of government. This means that people holding major political office (Kerry and Dean, to give two) will necessarily accumulate more moderate voting records due to the mere nature of our two-party system. I also suppose that imposing any international political standard on one country's politics will give an 'odd' result, to say the least.

By Ariesathena (Ariesathena) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 02:11 pm: Edit

I did find that the scale is a bit skewed - unless you are avidly in favour of big corporations running the country, you are going to fall to the left of center on the economic scale.

Some of the "centering" is also due to current standards. Those who are considered "libertarian/anarchists" because, in part, they don't believe that a woman's duty is to her home really are not that radical - give it about twenty years, and that will be normal.

By Thedad (Thedad) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 04:05 pm: Edit

An interesting toy-- -4.38, -4.41 (right there with MassDad)--but I'm not sure how real it is. It puts me there with Dennis Kucinich and Al Sharpton, who are anathema to me.

My own gut model of American politics for the last 30 years has been three-dimensional: social, economic, and foreign policy.

Refining the questions/scales would be an interesting Poli Sci project.

MassDad, are you going to the musical "Hello, Dalai!"

By Bumblebee83 (Bumblebee83) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 04:19 pm: Edit

So there's no politicians around my score....weird.
Economic 2.62
Social -5.69

By Gottagetout (Gottagetout) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 08:58 pm: Edit

I am (2.50, -2.72).

I love you Ayn Rand.

By Aspirer42 (Aspirer42) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 09:03 pm: Edit

...and when I mentioned 'no drag-down inflammatory arguments', I was trying to keep political debates under control. Bash the PC all you want; I don't care. ;)

And yeah, I think those of you who fall in the 'fourth quadrant' are going to be sharing some room with Ayn Rand and/or a lot of the Libertarians out there. Free State Project, anyone?

By Averagemathgeek (Averagemathgeek) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 09:08 pm: Edit

Yes, go Free State Project! I am not sure if the FSP will have a big effect on politics though. It might make people realize the value of liberty. It would be interesting if they did get the 20000 people there and decided to secede from the nation.

By Moojuice (Moojuice) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 09:36 pm: Edit

This is kind of an interesting trend we've got going here. It seems that about half of the people are moderately libertarian and moderately economically conservative. Then you've got about a quarter of the people who are just barely in the third quadrant. Then there's the other people who are spread around everywhere else. Almost no one is extremely liberal/libretarian or facist/conservative. Anyone have some explanation for this trend?

By Purgeofdoors (Purgeofdoors) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 09:57 pm: Edit

Moojuice, the reasons for the combination and expansion of economically conservative and libertarian would make for an interesting (and massive) sociological study. I have a few hypotheses, feel free to critique as desired:

1) Practical failure of "Old Liberal" and "Old Conservative" policies. As more and more files are released detailing the massacres of Stalin and Mao, being 'Communist' just isn't so cool anymore. At the same time, the "Old Conservativism" is often associated with '50s gender biases and racism (and on the more extreme front, Hitlerian Fascism). While it isn't nearly as well-known, Great Britain's 30-year-long flirtation with socialism (and resulting post-WWII weakness) can easily be compared to the capitalist Adenauer's amazing reconstruction of a gutted postwar Germany. While we may not be able to name the events, these events are incorporated into the atmosphere in which we've been raised.

2) Building on that atmosphere: The Cold War is over. Kids today are wealthier, well-treated, and do not have the fear of nuclear conflict ingrained within them. Thus, there is no real need for teens to have rebellious feeling against our society... it's just simpler to go with the flow of our capitalist structure and (as the 90s boom seemed to prove) get rich. Plus, there was going to be an inevitable "counter-rebellion" against any whiff of our parents engaging in a society of "free love." I could go into Spock's revolution and the countercultural child-rearing of the sixties, but I won't because it's not something I know too much about.

By Moojuice (Moojuice) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 10:17 pm: Edit

Right, I agree with number 1 but sort of disagree with number 2. Also, as I don't know a whole lot about Spock (won't go into much detail), but I think he was hinting at treat your kids better and don't hit them with large pointy objects when they do something you don't like. Makes a lot of sense on many levels.

I personally don't agree with number 2 because although kids here in "civilized" societies like the US are generally wealthier they are not all around the world. This makes for liberalism as it is today, in my opinion. Many feel that because we have it better off than the rest of the world we should help those not in as good of a position. You've got the corporate machines which are viewed by many (including myself) to be plundering developing countries. This is left over from the cold war. Just change the PC name -- "third world" to "developing". Many of the countries we were fighting the soviets for during the last fifty years are now countries we have shops set up in to make our cheap shoes.

This leads to the idea of the Establishment, or as it's trendy to say now, The Man.

I suppose what I'm trying to say is that it's still trendy to rebel against corporate America today. The old Establishment from the 50's has been replaced with our pirate like Man from the 90's, giving today's generation something to rebel against.

By Gottagetout (Gottagetout) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 10:34 pm: Edit

I'm not sure if this trend that has been pointed out is indicative of our age group in society as a whole but I can offer plausible explanations for this trend in the population of posters on a college worry board.

1. By the very nature of achieving and wanting to achieve (coming to these boards), posters are self-selected for libertarianism to authoritarianism (personal achievement and personal freedom go hand in hand). Furthermore, there is a response bias towards those who care (correlated with personal and societal freedom).

2. After this comes the left/right split. Quite a few posters are economically conservative due to the personal freedom/personal gain ideals. They believe that their work should be rewarded through the free market and that they should sink or swim based on their ability and others should not ask for hand-outs. The left ideology is one of the standard liberal, intellectual elite: let's help everyone is society and live in peace with no pain or hunger anywhere. Both sides are understandable although the younger generation of "achievers" seems to be interested in personal success more than helping his fellow man (yes it sounds biased but I lean the otherway and I find nothing wrong and everything right with this).

Therefore we have this 1/2 right/down, 1/4 left/down, 1/4 elsewhere split.

By Alejandro (Alejandro) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 11:22 pm: Edit

Economic Left/Right: -2.00
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -2.67

Im pretty relaxed i guess

By Avs21 (Avs21) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 11:53 pm: Edit

Economic: 5.50
Social: 3.75

By Goodchocolate (Goodchocolate) on Monday, May 17, 2004 - 11:55 pm: Edit

Economic Left/Right: 3.25
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 4.10

Not only are colleges dominated by liberals, but so are college message boards!

By Avs21 (Avs21) on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 12:03 am: Edit

Yes

By Moojuice (Moojuice) on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 12:17 am: Edit

Oh, boohoo. If you don't like it, you don't have to come here. And you don't have to go to college. It wouldn't kill you to learn something about the opinions of your political opponents anyway. It'll make you *gasp* a stronger conservative.

By Thedad (Thedad) on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 12:36 am: Edit

Yes, it's amazing to see the effects of education in the broadest sense, isn't it? I wish we had more of it.

By Goodchocolate (Goodchocolate) on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 03:38 pm: Edit

Moojuice:
____________________________________________________________________________________________
It wouldn't kill you to learn something about the opinions of your political opponents anyway. It'll make you *gasp* a stronger conservative.
____________________________________________________________________________________________

How do you know I don't know about the opinions of my political opponets? I do know that liberals constantly blab about how prejudging is bad, yet they're almost always the first to prejudge...

Thedad:
____________________________________________________________________________________________
Yes, it's amazing to see the effects of education in the broadest sense, isn't it? I wish we had more of it.
____________________________________________________________________________________________

The average adult in the U.S. only reads about one book a year. Do you actually think people today, even college graduates, are more enlightened than people in the, say, 1900's? The facts say no, but I'm sure it's "culturally relative" or something.

By Thedad (Thedad) on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 08:31 pm: Edit

Actually, book reading is a highly bi-modal activity. Many people read no books a year, many read dozens.

It pays to be suspicious of some stats, e.g., the average person has one testicle.

By Goodchocolate (Goodchocolate) on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 09:03 pm: Edit

Do you actually think people in the 1990's - 2000's are better educated than people in the 1890's - 1900's?

By Ariesathena (Ariesathena) on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 10:13 pm: Edit

Goodchocolate: on the whole, yes. Literacy rates are extremely high. I do think that education in the 19th century was largely restricted to the upper classes who could afford it. They were probably more educated than the average person today... but what are we comparing? Average degree of education of educated people (i.e. eliminating the uneducated persons of the late 19th century)? Average education of all people?

The scope of education has changed radically. Modern people have (or should, by high school graduation) a very solid knowledge of science, much of which was not even known in the late 1800s. The knowledge base of science has grown exponentially, which has resulted in people being more scientifically literate (most people could identify DNA, theory of relativity, etc to some degree - all concepts/discoveries which were not known in the 1890s), but certainly less classically literate.

By Alejandro (Alejandro) on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 10:16 pm: Edit

i agree, plus if you feel lazy you have those power bars, so that really boosts your intelligence and will to work.

By Headache86 (Headache86) on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 10:28 pm: Edit

-6.12, -3.64
sheeesh didnt think i was that liberal
pretty cool :-)

By Goodchocolate (Goodchocolate) on Tuesday, May 18, 2004 - 10:58 pm: Edit

I was talking about college graduates, but it applies to both. I had the opportunity to look at end of the year tests the state of Oklahoma administered in the 1900's; for elementary school students!. The history questions on there were things most adults today wouldn't know, and the geography questions required that the students not only know where all the U.S. states are, but also geography about Europe and South America! The vast majority of students today can't locate more than fifteen states on a U.S. map. The vast majority of students today don't know anything about Stalin except that he was bad.

Also, itís worth noting that in that time period, it almost always the elite and hyper-intellectual ones who bothered with college. Nowadays any idiot can, and usually does, get a degree.

If anybody actually thinks the quality of our college graduates has *increased* since the 1900ís, explain HOW!

By Aparent4 (Aparent4) on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 04:07 pm: Edit

I took the test. The only famous people they listed with my scores were Nelson Mandela and the Dalai Lama. I told this to my s, who said, "Yes, that's you -- the least practical person I know!" Well, what can I say...

By Demingy (Demingy) on Wednesday, May 19, 2004 - 05:21 pm: Edit

Aparent 4, that's where I scored too (your son is hilarious btw).

Sorry to add this so late, but I just now got to reading this thread.

TheDad: "It pays to be suspicious of some stats, e.g., the average person has one testicle." That cracks me up, especially since there was an argument about the validity of statistics in another thread. And you're right about how the "average" could come about (assuming it is even accurate, no one I know has ever been asked how much they read). I know a LOT of people who don't read unless absolutely necessary (or avoid "adult books" because they are too long), but I think that my best friend, my boyfriend, and I pretty much make up for them with our reading (and then some). I actually still get a little surprised when someone says they don't read. It is hard to fathom (and rather sad).

By Jajas2 (Jajas2) on Saturday, May 29, 2004 - 02:18 am: Edit

You guys have to take the iconochasms quiz. WOW. It really opened my eyes. Especially to the fact that ghandi was a b*stard, lol.

By Goodchocolate (Goodchocolate) on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 10:14 am: Edit

I know this thread is kind of dead, but Dad took this and said he got:

Economic Left/Right: 7.88
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 6.41

:0

I must have been influenced by y'all the first time I took it, because I took it twice more, and both times I scored:

Economic Left/Right: 5.62
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 4.51

Wow...

By Noodleman (Noodleman) on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 10:32 am: Edit

Economic Left/Right: -3.50
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -7.18

Right there with the Dalai Lama. Booyaka!

By Athlonmj (Athlonmj) on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 11:48 am: Edit

Economic Left/Right: 3.25
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 3.08

Exactly where I thought I'd be. Fairly conservative.

By Insanity (Insanity) on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 12:01 pm: Edit

economic left/right: 4.88
Social Libertarian/authoritarian: -2.05

there are no international figures in my quadrant. Ahh

By Goodchocolate (Goodchocolate) on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 01:13 pm: Edit

Exactly where I thought I'd be. Fairly conservative.

Yes, your scores show you're fairly conservative -- but on this message board, you're one of the five most conservative people. (And I'm not kidding, either. :O)

By Gameguy56 (Gameguy56) on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 02:31 pm: Edit

Economic Left/Right: -2.62
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -4.26

moderate economically and more liberal socially. That Sounds about right.

By Cutie911 (Cutie911) on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 04:46 pm: Edit

I'm in the 3rd quadrant w/ the Dalai Lama and Gandhi

guess im a liberal

By Athlonmj (Athlonmj) on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 06:04 pm: Edit

I want to see my results after I read some Ann Coulter.

By Encomium (Encomium) on Tuesday, June 15, 2004 - 07:39 pm: Edit

Your political compass


Economic Left/Right: -1.12
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -3.95

I always thought I was conservative-ish.

By Student8712 (Student8712) on Saturday, June 19, 2004 - 03:53 am: Edit

Economic Left/Right: 8.50
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 6.15

By Thenarrator (Thenarrator) on Saturday, June 19, 2004 - 12:29 pm: Edit

eco l/r- +1.75
Social L/A -1.33

ayn rand....yeah, thats right

By Jblackboy05 (Jblackboy05) on Saturday, June 19, 2004 - 12:56 pm: Edit

-5.38 and -5.74-Me, the Dalai Lama, Nelson Mandela, and Ghandi are in the same boat

By Televelis (Televelis) on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 08:23 pm: Edit

Economic Left/Right: 1.12
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -1.03

By Rohit_Sn (Rohit_Sn) on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 08:40 pm: Edit

eco l/r -.25
social l/a -2.67

By Priglet (Priglet) on Monday, June 21, 2004 - 10:32 pm: Edit

-2.62 econ l/r
-2.15 soc l/a

and still prolife.

By Paulhomework (Paulhomework) on Tuesday, June 22, 2004 - 11:43 am: Edit

ahh, i don't remember the exact coordinates, but i'm near the center in the third quadrant (closer to libertarian, closer to left).

By Justice (Justice) on Tuesday, June 22, 2004 - 09:10 pm: Edit

Economic Left/Right: -4.12
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -4.46

And I'm fairly moderate too. Would anyone else hav serious issues in trying to understand how someone can be positive on the economic scale? I mean I understand right-wing economics and it's validity, but how can some normal person say "hmm globalization, let's use it to benefit wealth NGOs and not all the people on earth."

By Babybird87 (Babybird87) on Wednesday, June 23, 2004 - 12:34 am: Edit

Economic Left/Right: 4.38
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 2.46

i would have said I was more conservative than Tony Blair, but OK.

By Flyingpenguin (Flyingpenguin) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 01:13 am: Edit

Econ left/right 1.25
Social Libertarian/Authortian -5
No political figure is in the fourth quadrant. Wonder why, sarcastically.

By Masterchris (Masterchris) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 01:46 am: Edit

Econ: 3.5
Libertarian/authoritarian: -.5

By Bunmushroom (Bunmushroom) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 02:50 am: Edit

Econ left/right: 4.1
Social Libertarian/Authortian: .01

By Mahras (Mahras) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 04:11 am: Edit

Libertarian Left

Economic Left/Right: -4.25
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -3.64

I believe its very accurate. Two figures I strongly support, The Dalai Lama and Gandhi are in my quadrant.

Not a real surprise though. I have always been left leaning.

By Songman (Songman) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 12:34 pm: Edit

Economic left/right 3.12

Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: 0.72

It would be interesting if the posters also posted their age.I am 40+

By Jaug1 (Jaug1) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 03:10 pm: Edit

Songman. Thats a very interesting thing that you post about age and how it affects us as young idealists moving towards people living in the real world.

Age: 16
Econ: -7.25
Social Libertarian/Authoritarian: -5.13

I have always considered myself very liberal and will always be. Looks like I am the 2nd most liberal on the board. Why does that not suprise me...

By Babybird87 (Babybird87) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 04:50 pm: Edit

I am 16 and I'm conservative, I don't see how we can all be dubbed "young idealists"

By Jaug1 (Jaug1) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 05:18 pm: Edit

My mistake. Where I come from (Southern California, LA County), most people are young idealists. There are always exceptions to everything.

By Jlq3d3 (Jlq3d3) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 05:39 pm: Edit

jauq, I am from los angeles, not just la county, but the city of la. I am conservative. Most young people here in la are not idealists in either direction, left or right. Most are ignorant apathetic people. And you can be an idealist for either side. You might have your ideals, and I might have my ideals.

By Jlq3d3 (Jlq3d3) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 05:41 pm: Edit

oh yes, one more thing. I am 18. Another thing, I will be going to college in the most liberal places in the us (bay area, Stanford specificly).

By Jaug1 (Jaug1) on Thursday, June 24, 2004 - 06:05 pm: Edit

Stanford? hmmm...maybe I should reconsider applying there...lol. Congrats Jlq. Most of my friends and people that I know are very liberal. Yes, I would agree with you that most are ignorant and apathetic. However, the majority of those that are educated are liberal. There is a large number of conservatives, but the outstanding majority is liberal.

By Babybird87 (Babybird87) on Friday, June 25, 2004 - 01:09 am: Edit

michael moore's suggestion that America is a liberal country, though, was preposterous. America was founded on religion, and the religious tend to be conservative (not always, but usually).


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