Violation of early decision agreement





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Discus: College Admissions: March 2004 Archive: Violation of early decision agreement
By Churchill (Churchill) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 11:48 am: Edit

lets say you applied early decision and was admitted to your first choice school but accidentally forgot to withdraw to the rest of your other schools ... then, your second choice to which you applied to send you a likely letter with a scholarship award. now, things get messy because your penny-pinching mother wants you to go to your second choice school (which most of ppl wouldnt mind going and is defintely not a safety). and you are seriously contemplating that choice too. are we breaking serious trust here? imean, first off you arent suppose to receive any further offer of admission from any other college in the first place. and even after receiving the likely, you are maybe not going to notify ur second-choice? if the two schools find out, wont they both withdrew offers? should i just play it safe and tell them?

By Voigtrob (Voigtrob) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 11:59 am: Edit

"you are seriously contemplating that choice too."

Sorry, it's not a choice. Simply not an option. Withdraw all of your other applications aside from your ED school, NOW, if you don't want to risk being rejected by ALL of them. This could eventually move towards being a serious violation of ethics, if you don't stop it TODAY.

By Jamimom (Jamimom) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 12:25 pm: Edit

You could lose your acceptance to second choice school along with the scholarship when they cross check the ED list that is circulated around to colleges. You would also lose acceptance to your first choice collegee for breaking the contract. You could then lose acceptances for all of the schools. That is the consequence if you are caught breaking the ED contract. None of this may happen, but it could also happen at the very end of the process with your highschool and GC brought into the investigation as well, since he needed to sign that ED contract as well as you and your parents.

Why would you want to break a contract anyways? You read and signed the thing knowing fully well what you were pledging.

By Garland (Garland) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 12:25 pm: Edit

My son was accepted by Columbia ED. He notified Umich, which had already accepted him. They seem to have internal communication problems, because since then, despite notification, they have offered him a 60,000 scholarship, a finalist position for admission to a special program which provides free room and board, and a personal letter from the head of the Physics Dept pretty much begging him to come.

IT DOESN'T MATTER. He cannot break that ED commitment, even if he wanted to. (which he doesn't). It is just that--a commitment. This student needs to tell his parents that he could end up nowhere next year if he breaks the ED contract.

By Mzhang23 (Mzhang23) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 12:35 pm: Edit

There have been a ton of threads on this.

It is morally and legally wrong to break a binding ED contract, and doing so could well result in the rescinding of all your admittances.

Your school's reputation will also suffer, because it will make your college counselor look like he/she is not minding the students, and admissions at your school will likely suffer for the next few years to the involved institutions due to one student's breaking of a very important contract.

The only reason one may break ED is if the financial aid offer is not enough, but even before that is done, one must undergo serious negotiation with the concerned school's financial aid office and then decide to rescind the school's offer of admission before applying elsewhere.

Do what is right: inform your other schools NOW, before they make their final decisions. Your receiving admittances in April could also result in rescindance of your admission at your ED school if they happen to find out. Furthermore, you are wasting spots that would normally be given to other people who CAN attend the school and are not bound by ED.

By Ariesathena (Ariesathena) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 01:47 pm: Edit

Obviously, if you don't matriculate at the ED school, they will realize that you broke the contract and applied elsewhere. I can bet that they would work very hard to find out where that other school is and inform them of the problem. You would certainly be looking at rescinded acceptances. Ergo, your only option is to attend the ED I school... and you need to make your mother aware of this.

By Northstarmom (Northstarmom) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 02:00 pm: Edit

Churchill,
I think you're trying to blame your mother for your own lack of ethics. I doubt that you "forgot" to withdraw your other applications. It's your life. You need to have ethics and withdraw your other applications, reject the scholarship from the non ED college, and stop blaming Mommy for your decisions.

By Thedad (Thedad) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 04:23 pm: Edit

I couldn't have put it better.

By Woogiewilly25 (Woogiewilly25) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 04:26 pm: Edit

Not true-a friend of mine got accepted ED to Cornell, but then accepted to MIT. She pulled out of the ED at Cornell and committed to play lacrosse at MIT...it is possible, if there is a serious discrepancy with money. I mean, it's not common and I'm sure not easy, but it's not impossible

By Adr531 (Adr531) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 05:26 pm: Edit

exactly. i hate to say it but they probably wont do anything about it. i know two kids who never matriculated to their first choice ed school and nothing was done about it

By Voigtrob (Voigtrob) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 05:40 pm: Edit

Trying to get out of an ED commitment for a non-legitimate reason is basically playing Russian Roulette with your life. I HIGHLY suggest you follow through on your ED school.

By Happykid (Happykid) on Tuesday, March 02, 2004 - 06:32 pm: Edit

In January 2004 archives there is a thread called "Backing out of ED: Is it possible?" You should look at it, Churchill.

The original poster, Whzup44412 / Penn08please, got a lot of flack/advice from parents and kids. In the end he decided to honor his contract and go with Haverford, his ED school (see Haverford 'Class of 2008', and Haverford 'Campus' in Individual Schools for details). You should do the same.

By Happykid (Happykid) on Wednesday, March 03, 2004 - 10:13 am: Edit

Churchill, I am also curious as to how you could have 'accidentally' forgotten to withdraw from the rest of the schools. It doesn't look good any way you look at it.

By P3nguinpi3 (P3nguinpi3) on Wednesday, March 03, 2004 - 01:01 pm: Edit

The only EASY way to back out of ED is if you don't receive the need-based financial aid required from a school.

By Churchill (Churchill) on Wednesday, March 03, 2004 - 05:02 pm: Edit

You people are right. I think i'm just going to tell my second choice school. Honestly, what it comes down to, I think is that, even if I applied regular decision and not early decision, I would still go to the school that I have applied early decision regardless of finacial reasons, they have already been generous with finacial aid and such, and I dont think there's a better place where I would rather go than the ED school that I have gotten in. Nevertheless, as much as I love my ED school, I wish the whole early decision policy could be less restrictive, I mean I applied early decision partly out of the fear that if I didnt I wouldnt have gotten in. And if selective colleges werent so biased towards ED candidates, I probably would have applied regular. Well in any case, im glad that at least this whole college admission hoopla worked out in my case pretty well.

By Jamimom (Jamimom) on Wednesday, March 03, 2004 - 05:15 pm: Edit

It is easy to forget to notify your other schools that you have been accepted ED. Most kids do not do it on their own according to my son's school. Their college guidance dept has postcards sitting there and they basically oversee the notifications as the kids' ED acceptances arrive. Even worse is the courtesy notification of the selected school in May. Many kids do not return the postcard sent by the schools asking to be notified if the student is going elsewhere so that his seat can be given to someone on the waitlist. People just don't like to bother.

Breaking the ED contract carries the risk of having both acceptances (the ED school and the other school) rescinded. And it can happen at the very end of the process. Right now schools are frantically trying to get through the application reading process and get the acceptance letters out. Once that is done, the adcoms will have more time to pursue other things like what happened to this ED student who has not sent in his deposit? So there is a real risk there. The biggest sin about reneging, however, is that you are breaking a contract that you willingly and knowingly signed with parent and GC as witnesses signing as well. Not a good start for someone going off into his own life.

By Xiggi (Xiggi) on Wednesday, March 03, 2004 - 05:35 pm: Edit

The only EASY way to back out of ED is if you don't receive the need-based financial aid required from a school.

Not true! The school decides what is the need, not YOU!

The only reason one may break ED is if the financial aid offer is not enough, but even before that is done, one must undergo serious negotiation with the concerned school's financial aid office and then decide to rescind the school's offer of admission before applying elsewhere.

You do not have the right to rescind your contract. Only the school has that right but no obligation to release you from your obligation. You have signed a binding contract and, although the school may negotiate a better package, your ED contract is not the beginning of a negotiations round. That is why many people CANNOT apply ED.

They will not put a gun to your head and cannot force you to attend their school but they can and SHOULD make sure you do not attend any of your RD schools. By not withdrawing your RD applications, you DID play games and you should pay the consequences.


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