Which colleges value SAT's and EC's more than GPA!?





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Discus: College Admissions: 2002 - 2003 Archive: August 2003 Archive: Which colleges value SAT's and EC's more than GPA!?
By Adxj220 (Adxj220) on Saturday, August 09, 2003 - 04:34 pm: Edit

Okay, I realize that all colleges value gpa's above all. But that's not my strong point. Can anyone suggest any of the top 35 colleges that put a lot of emphasis on test scores,recs or ec's and less on gpa? Who doesn't care about freshman year apart from Princeton and Umich? Thanks.

By Grapeful (Grapeful) on Saturday, August 09, 2003 - 07:35 pm: Edit

almost all colleges favor SAT/EC over GPA

By Ama (Ama) on Saturday, August 09, 2003 - 08:15 pm: Edit

Not true at all....>>>>

By Stephenpmi (Stephenpmi) on Saturday, August 09, 2003 - 08:48 pm: Edit

In SOME cases, colleges might regard a person with a high SAT/low GPA as one who has not taken advantage of his or her full academic potential at their school, and thus may not matriculate at their college because of the high academic standards.

On the other hand, if one's school's grading scale is very difficult, or if one has taken the hardest courses in order to learn as much as he or she can, the colleges do understand in some cases. If your class rank is low as well, that may cause problems.

GPA, SAT scores, etc., etc., are never a definite barrier to admission.

By Adxj220 (Adxj220) on Saturday, August 09, 2003 - 09:49 pm: Edit

never a barrier to admission...? seems, unfortunately, a little idealistic in terms of the ivies and other highly selective schools. I do take the toughest course load at a highly regarded school. But I'm talking a 3.4 gpa and 1560 SAT, 800, 800, and 780 on SAT 2's and internships with congressman, published photography books, club leadership etc. Any schools that lean towards my strengths? I'm applying for polisci.

By Purgeofdoors (Purgeofdoors) on Saturday, August 09, 2003 - 10:08 pm: Edit

If most of your bad grades were in math/science classes unassociated with your major, it would be a little more excusable. Same deal if the bad grades were freshman year.

It'll still hurt you though.

By Rashmi (Rashmi) on Sunday, August 10, 2003 - 09:09 am: Edit

Ok...I have a similar kind of problem.
SAT-I-690V, 770M.
My 9th and 10th marks were very good.
But for my 11th and 12th, I moved to this really competitive school-and here I'm taking the hardest courses and my class is like the cream of all the other classes in my entire city. So the point is will the adcom see me as someone who has not taken advantage of her full academic potential at her school???? or will they realize that my school's grading scale is very difficult????

By Massdad (Massdad) on Sunday, August 10, 2003 - 05:38 pm: Edit

Look guys, use common sense. First question an adcom will ask is why the low grades? Family circumstances? Motivation? Illness? If the reaon is one that should be considered an extenuating circumstance, then it's up to you and your advisors to get the message across. If it just "I don't do well in science (because I find it boring, and don't want to major in it anyway...), then you lose.

Now, how to neutralize a liability? You will not at the most selective. They have others with scores just as good with better GPA. BUT, there a a number of schools that will give you just as good an education, with perhaps a bit less prestige, that want to enhance their stats, and recruit kids with high test scores. You've probably heard from some already. If not, hit the web, and look for those that offer, for instance, merit aid bases solely on test scores. They are out there.

By Adxj220 (Adxj220) on Monday, August 11, 2003 - 08:00 pm: Edit

But aren't there some places that could play to my strengths? I haven't been slacking--I take the toughest course load available and do a ton of out of school stuff. But I go to a nationally regarded school that sends about 15+ percent of its kids to ivies. My unweighted gpa would put me at about the 20th percentile in my class (weighted would help me by about 7 percent). note: my school doesn't give any of these stats so they can place more kids at top schools, and colleges can't find out. I have heard that engineering schools like MIT, or public schools like the UC's and UMich give a lot of weight to SAT's and SAT 2's. My gpa is weighted down somewhat by freshman year...Any suggestions?

By Folk_Hero (Folk_Hero) on Monday, August 11, 2003 - 08:53 pm: Edit

As far as I know, in the points system that most schools use to evaluate apps, if you apply to engineering your test scores are worth a lot more -- but they have to be good!

By Dadof3ivygrads (Dadof3ivygrads) on Friday, August 15, 2003 - 08:05 pm: Edit

Most good schools value GPA above SAT. They only want to know that you got a decent grade on a standard test, but what is really important is can you excel and are you driven to excel over long periods of time. I have had two admissions officers at very top schools tell me that the only applicant who is automatically rejected is high SAT with low GPA.

By Xiggi (Xiggi) on Friday, August 15, 2003 - 08:47 pm: Edit

Most good schools value GPA above SAT. They only want to know that you got a decent grade on a standard test, but what is really important is can you excel and are you driven to excel over long periods of time. I have had two admissions officers at very top schools tell me that the only applicant who is automatically rejected is high SAT with low GPA.

Do you know how many valedictorians are not able to break 1200 on the SAT? The high schools in the world range from highly selective to absolutely mediocre. That is why standardized tests were created.

By Dadof3ivygrads (Dadof3ivygrads) on Saturday, August 16, 2003 - 09:42 am: Edit

Xiggi
1. The difference in high schools is why Regional Recruiters were invented. When my #2 son talked to the Recruiter from Duke she immediately asked what high school he was from. WHen he told her, she knew some of the teachers personally, and could tell him the names of students from that HS who had been accepted at Duke. Top schools receive 1000s of apps -- they know which school is which. But you are missing the point -- a school like Duke (Harvard, Stanford, Chicago) receives 5000 or 6000 apps a year from students with top numbers. What they want to know is, are you JUST numbers? If so, they don't want you.
2. Standardized tests were created many years ago, and they mainly exist now so that their companies can make piles of money. Lots of schools have deemphasized them in recent years because they are not good predictors of success. However, they do have a minimal function as general validators of schools and one more way to evaluate students.


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