Can a kid with weird stats get into an Ivy?





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Discus: College Admissions: 2002 - 2003 Archive: August 2003 Archive: Can a kid with weird stats get into an Ivy?
By Annabrez (Annabrez) on Wednesday, August 06, 2003 - 10:17 pm: Edit

Hi, I'm a rising junior and I'm hoping my weird stats won't be looked down upon on an Ivy League application.

Freshman year GPA: 2.8
Sophomore year GPA: 3.1
Junior year: 4.2
(I had family problems my first two years.)
By the time I apply I'll have about a 3.7 unweighted... hopefully higher.
top 25% of a class of 375

PSAT: 1390
SAT: 1420 (taking it again)
Lawyer in mock trial all years, president next year
In Future Business Leaders of America all years
Debate team all years, vice president next year
Girl Scout for eight years, recipient of Gold, Silver and Bronze awards
Red Cross Club
in all of the school plays and Drama Club
member of Select Choir, Region Choir and All-State Choir
attending NJ Governor's School for creative writing this summer
and (this is what I'm hoping will help a lot) I had a novel published sophomore year

am I stupid for even thinking about it, or if I applied early would I have a chance?

By Northstarmom (Northstarmom) on Wednesday, August 06, 2003 - 10:26 pm: Edit

How was your novel published? Self published or through a publishing company? You are right that it could be your ticket into an Ivy, but it would help if it was published through a real company, not a vanity press

By Clickspring (Clickspring) on Wednesday, August 06, 2003 - 10:35 pm: Edit

Yeah, what's your book? That'll help you a lot! Just make sure that you explore lots of great colleges that aren't Ivy!

By Apguy (Apguy) on Wednesday, August 06, 2003 - 10:47 pm: Edit

A book+a 1420 will give you a good shot. And junior and senior year is what most colleges focus on because they believe that represents how you will perform when you come to their college moreso than freshman year. Work hard in your senior year as well.

As a side note, Princeton does not (or puts very little importance) on freshman grades. If you call the adcom office they will explain to you how much importance they put on freshman grades. So apply there.

Good luck!

By Annabrez (Annabrez) on Wednesday, August 06, 2003 - 11:23 pm: Edit

Oh, it wasn't vanity, I wrote it summer after freshman year, sent it out and it was picked up by Houghton Mifflin after 29745 rejections and even more revisions... and a whole lot of encouragement and support :)
thanks so much!

By Apguy (Apguy) on Thursday, August 07, 2003 - 03:07 am: Edit


Quote:

Houghton Mifflin




Very nice...

By Xiggi (Xiggi) on Thursday, August 07, 2003 - 03:25 am: Edit

You have nothing to lose by applying (short of the fees, of course).

Were you to bump theSAT Verbal in the highest range and add a few nice SAT-II, you could have a good chance.

Your essays may very well provide the clincher!

By Northstarmom (Northstarmom) on Thursday, August 07, 2003 - 11:06 am: Edit

If you've had a book published by Houghton Mifflin, you already have shot to the top range of Ivy applicants -- people who have made a national-level achievement.

My thoughts are that you should not worry about your SAT score. It's fine.

What you should concentrate on is writing application essays that highlight your writing talents, drive and creativity. You also should highlight those things during your in your interviews. Certainly do not bury the info about your book like you did in your opening post here. Adcoms and interviewers are busy. If you don't quickly and expressively state what makes you special, they will write you off.

Of course, keep getting good grades, too.

And do keep in mind that what you have going for you is far better than what people have who have 1550 scores, #1 in their class, and are president of some school activities. You have the requisite grades/scores showing you can handle Ivy work plus you have made a very impressive and unusual achievement, one that also demonstrates strong intellectual drive and talent.

Best of luck!

By Nautical_2000 (Nautical_2000) on Thursday, August 07, 2003 - 12:14 pm: Edit

this is just a general complaint: why is it that a high SAT score can offset a low GPA, but not visa versa? SAT tests a limited number of skills, and takes place on just the day you took it. GPA measures the hardwork you did as a student to earn those good grades (yes, i know there's grade inflation)

this is not to offend you Annabrez. i think it's wonderful that you've had a book published! plus how you've gotten your grades back on track after your family problems. good luck, i'm just complaining that's all...

By Morgantruce (Morgantruce) on Thursday, August 07, 2003 - 02:35 pm: Edit

I'd certainly be using some author's copies to send out along with an application... or if that seems too bulky to you, send copies of some good reviews of your book (author, title, and publisher highlighted in neon marker!)

No time to be shy and retiring...

Care to share the title? (will understand if you don't...)

By Marthpodi (Marthpodi) on Thursday, August 07, 2003 - 04:59 pm: Edit

Yeah, I'd like to see it as well. With a book published by Houghton Mifflin, I think you've definately got a shot.

By Northstarmom (Northstarmom) on Thursday, August 07, 2003 - 05:53 pm: Edit

A high SAT can not offset a low GPA. The opposite is far more likely to happen. Colleges view students with high SAT/low gpa as lazy and as risk of being future college drop outs and flunk outs.

A high gpa, low SAT is viewed more as a reflection of coming from an inadequate school, something that's not the student's fault. GPA is a far better predictor of college performance than is the SAT I.

By Aparent (Aparent) on Thursday, August 07, 2003 - 07:23 pm: Edit

"A high gpa, low SAT is viewed more as a reflection of coming from an inadequate school, something that's not the student's fault." Hmmm. Not sure about that. At our school it is not unusual for a student to be among the top three in the class with not-spectacular board scores; students who rank slightly below them and have much higher boards invariably do better at top admissions. Sometimes a high gpa, low SAT is the sign of a "hard worker" who is putting all her or his energy into getting those grades. I guess there are all sorts of stories out there...

By John (John) on Friday, August 08, 2003 - 10:07 am: Edit

In all honesty I think that your GPA is gonna be what kills you. It's not really as much about GPA as it is about class rank, no school is gonna like the fact that 20% of the kids in your class did better than you, and I think because of that you have very little chance at getting into an Ivy.

By Morgantruce (Morgantruce) on Friday, August 08, 2003 - 11:03 am: Edit

Well, I'd hold off joining the French Foreign Legion just yet. There are a lot of very fine colleges that will take you gladly--many of them that you would be proud to attend and have a great education. Keep things in perspective.

It's not so much that the ivys are so vastly superior to any non-ivy; it's just that there are so many students who are supremely confident that such a falsehood is the truth.

Saying that you want to go to an ivy is much earier than finding the several schools that are a match made in heaven for you.

By Ch2 (Ch2) on Friday, August 08, 2003 - 11:22 am: Edit

hey - congrats on getting the Gold Award in Girl Scouts! I am finishing up mine this summer and I know how hard it is, even though it seems like people don't pay much attention to it. I'd say you have a shot an an Ivy - but, which one?

By Mike (Mike) on Friday, August 08, 2003 - 12:37 pm: Edit

I suspect you have a shot at the Ivies becasue they like variety and varied experiences. They have plenty of 1600 SATs 4pts and valdictorians to cover up any flaws yur stats bring. The book, your rising grades and EC's are top notch. If they don't want you many if not most of the top LACs will. If I had the motivation and desire to be a writer I'd go to a LAC. Much better 1:1 suport from profs.

Mike's Dad

By Anotherdad (Anotherdad) on Monday, August 11, 2003 - 11:49 am: Edit

MorganTruce writes, "It's not so much that the ivys are so vastly superior to any non-ivy; it's just that there are so many students who are supremely confident that such a falsehood is the truth."

Condense this to "So many so supremely confident that such a falsehood is the truth." and you get an epigram that concisely describes one of the great dangers that you will face in your school years and beyond. Once again, the wisdom of MT!


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