Which colleges have great academics but grade inflation?





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Discus: College Admissions: 2002 - 2003 Archive: August 2003 Archive: Which colleges have great academics but grade inflation?
By Supers32 (Supers32) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 05:25 pm: Edit

Which colleges have great academics, but at the same time, are relatively easy to get a good GPA in? I would assume that such a college is ideal for someone wanting to go to graduate school...right?

By Morgantruce (Morgantruce) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 05:55 pm: Edit

Why do students so seriously underestimate the intelligence of the people that run colleges?

Do you think people in graduate school admissions blindly look at grades without questioning the reputation of the school that gave those grades?

If you're even considering going to college, why aren't you just plain offended by the whole notion of grade inflation?

By Twinkletoes696 (Twinkletoes696) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 06:27 pm: Edit

I like the idea of grade inflation to a slight degree.

As in, I'm not into working my butt off for a "D". I've heard of schools where you have to kill yourself to get a "C", etc. which sounds like grade deflation to me.

Grade inflation is bad if you haven't earned the grade; sometimes I think it's a good idea if the classes are especially difficult, etc.

By Beenthereil (Beenthereil) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 06:46 pm: Edit

There was a mild "scandal" just a few short months ago which talked about Harvard and "grade inflation"...Something like 92% getting A or A-.

I would call that grade inflation.

By Serene (Serene) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 08:02 pm: Edit

92% isn't supposed to be an A?

By Xiggi (Xiggi) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 08:39 pm: Edit

Think he meant 92% of class getting at least A-

By Emeraldkity4 (Emeraldkity4) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 08:40 pm: Edit

92% of the class got an "A" not that 92% for a grade wasn't an "A"
I guess Harvard doesn't grade on a curve.


As the speaker at convocation at Reed told the incoming freshman class, "Many of you were the top % of your classes, in high school, now 50% of you will be below average"


You would think it would be enough to just get a diploma from Harvard, but apparently it has to be a Phi Beta Kappa award.

By Giants (Giants) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 10:09 pm: Edit

All of the Ivies have grade inflation.

By Trojan1444 (Trojan1444) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 10:31 pm: Edit

Think about this....at a school like Harvard, you've got the best of the best from around the world. Wouldn't you expect that 90% of them could get A's?

I mean it's not like it's a random sampling of the general population. These are extremely bright people.

But secondly, to answer Morgantruce, in California for example all UC grad schools are NOT allowed to take into account which undergrad school an applicant went to. They say its unfair. So, someone applying to UC Berkeley Law School who got a 3.8 at Harvard is the same as someone who got a 3.8 at UC Santa Cruz. Unfair, but true.

By Stanfordhopeful (Stanfordhopeful) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 10:45 pm: Edit

"Think about this....at a school like Harvard, you've got the best of the best from around the world. Wouldn't you expect that 90% of them could get A's?

I mean it's not like it's a random sampling of the general population. These are extremely bright people."

Uh.. no.

Comparable colleges such as Yale and Princeton don't have numbers this high. MIT, whose student body is just as good if not better than Harvard, has students clamoring for a 3.0 GPA.

By Emeraldkity4 (Emeraldkity4) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 11:06 pm: Edit

Caltech & Mit have some of the highest numbers of students who attain a PH.d, Yale is mentioned in at least one category, so is Princeton. Harvard zilch- don't know why- I certainly know more people who have gone to Harvard for grad school than anyother, but why aren't Harvard grads getting Ph.ds , are they all going to law or medical school?
Inquiring minds want to know!

By Terpfan101 (Terpfan101) on Sunday, August 03, 2003 - 11:30 pm: Edit

i think that a lot of the inflation at harvard stems from the fact that these kids' parents are paying a ton of money to go to the school with the most prestigious name (even though its not the best school). They probably complain and say they want their kids to get top grades since they are paying this money.

By Ariesathena (Ariesathena) on Monday, August 04, 2003 - 09:23 pm: Edit

Harvard's grade inflation began during the Vietnam war when students had to keep a certain GPA to avoid being drafted. Harvard figured that its students would be acing any other school and thus be exempt from the draft, and changed their grading policies accordingly. Now, there are professors at Harvard who will assign two grades: one which is the deserved one, another which goes on the transcipt and is inflated. This is done to prevent students avoiding the class and the associated lowered grade. On the other hand, you know an MIT grad can work - which is certainly reflected in job opportunites and admissions into graduate schools.

By Giants (Giants) on Monday, August 04, 2003 - 09:41 pm: Edit

My sister went to Yale and said that there is a great deal of grade inflation to add to my point. There's no doubt that a lot of the kids that go to the Ivies are intelligent, but it's doubtful that overall grades would be that high.

By Thecurious1 (Thecurious1) on Tuesday, August 05, 2003 - 10:57 am: Edit

Giants: Not all Ivies inflate grades! Harvard, Yale and Penn are exceptions. Penn doesn't inflate so much as Harvard and Yale though. It's very small.

By Binks (Binks) on Tuesday, August 05, 2003 - 02:17 pm: Edit

I agree, not all Ivies do. Cornell for one, has the reputation for one of the hardest academic programs in the nation. In fact, there's a reason why they have the number one suicide rate in the country. I mean, think about it. Kids who were valedictorians and top 10's go to that school and end up getting C's and D's. Wouldn't you think that's a little drastic?

By Netequevaris (Netequevaris) on Wednesday, August 20, 2003 - 10:50 pm: Edit

Grade inflation on undergraduates is the effect of grade inflation in grad school. I learned this the hard way as an undergraduate taking graduate classes. My sophomore year, I took a doctoral seminar and got a b+. that didn't seem bad to me, but anything short of an a or a- to a graduate student is considered shameful.

to grad students, an a=a a-=b b+ = c and a c = d. if you get 'c's in grad school, you will be asked to leave. this works its way down to the undergraduate level to a large extent. also, the only way to counter wide-spread inflation is to use encompassing bell-curves. this is somewhat self-destructive, though inflation just boosts grades - this makes recommendations even more important.

certain departments at schools have a different kind of inflation. some smaller departments, self-selective, have higher gpa averages, but larger departments are lower because you get disinterested groups.

By Masamune707 (Masamune707) on Thursday, August 21, 2003 - 03:09 pm: Edit

um i dont want to be offensive but i do agree with wut stanfordhopeful said..we all kno that harvard is EXTREMELY hard to get into ...but ive heard that the classes at harvard are really easy compared to classes at cornell


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