Lying on Application





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Discus: College Admissions: 2002 - 2003 Archive: July 2003 Archive: Lying on Application
By Strmadden (Strmadden) on Tuesday, July 29, 2003 - 06:22 pm: Edit

What's stoping someone from lying on their application? (besides their conscience I mean). Not that I would do it because the consequences are too high, but do schools even check? They can't possibly look into every student. Also, do you ballpark the amount of hours spent on volunteering if you were not required to keep an exact record?

By Justplayin104 (Justplayin104) on Tuesday, July 29, 2003 - 10:54 pm: Edit

To the volunteering hours, I'm putting a ballpark number, 50-60. Beside all my volunteering jobs, i'm giving my estimate, so when added up it will equal 55.

to the lying: nothing is stopping somebody, not even their signature at the bottom of the application. You can completely make up volunteer hours you did in 9th and 10th grade, and nobody will know. If they do a back ground check, nobody is going to remember that you volunteered at the Great Garbage Pickup for 6 hours in 10th grade. Heck, for some volunteer jobs there may not even be anybody to call!
So yes, volunteer jobs and hours are the easiest to lie on.

Another easy part to lie: Dartmouth has a peer recommendation form that a friend fills out and writes about you. You could so completely write that yourself, but I don't see why you would. Unless you have no friends, of course.

Another easy part: the essay itself. You could very easily use a friend's essay that isn't applying to your schools, and call it your own.

The fact is, many more people than you think lie or exaggerate. I always say: 50% of the people half-heartedly do volunteer hours, the 50% stay home, study, and make it up on the application. (Plus/Minus some, I know. Some people legitimately love volunteering.) And truthfully, the people who half-heartedly do volunteer work aren't any more altruistic than the one who throws away a piece of litter while walking through the park. So why does it matter??

When all is said and done, and it's May and you're graduating, nobody is going to care, so why worry about it now? If my friend wants to say she's Captain of the softball team, then OK. A college isn't going to admit/reject her based on that. They get thousands of Captains and "Captains," she won't stand out.

By Morgantruce (Morgantruce) on Tuesday, July 29, 2003 - 11:25 pm: Edit

Whenever you lie on ANY application you open yourself up to some awful possibilities:

on a college application, they can throw you out of college in your third year (when they happen to discover your lie).

on an employment application, they can fire you whenver they discover the lie.

----

Whatever it is that you gain from the application can and will be be revoked whenever the lie is discovered. Happens all the time...

By Emyh (Emyh) on Tuesday, July 29, 2003 - 11:43 pm: Edit

I believe the UCs do a random check now. They found 4 that lied.

By Justplayin104 (Justplayin104) on Wednesday, July 30, 2003 - 12:14 am: Edit

Most of the stuff you would lie about is pretty much too insignificant to base a decision on. For example: if you have 0 volunteer hours, you can make up 10, but it won't get you anywhere. Or you can make up 50, in which case they would probably find out someway somehow.

If you have 50 volunteer hours altogether, you can make up 5 and it wouldn't make a difference.
If you have 230 volunteer hours, you can make up 20 and it wouldn't make a difference.

In order for something you make up to have a significant impact, it would have to be large - large enough to catch. In my opinion, it's not worth them discovering that you're not really the Captain of the softball team and rejecting you because of something so stupid (in a case where they would prob admit you if they care enough to check up on it).

In response to what Morgantruce said: I heard that people can get their degrees revoked if they found out you lied on your application. I agree that the consequences can be devastating.

But don't college throw out your applications? I know on the teacher recs they say that the student has full access to the application/recs upon enrolling to the college. But do they really keep them for 3 and 4 years? That's an awful lot to keep track of throughout the years...

By Apguy (Apguy) on Wednesday, July 30, 2003 - 12:19 am: Edit


Quote:

When all is said and done, and it's May and you're graduating, nobody is going to care, so why worry about it now? If my friend wants to say she's Captain of the softball team, then OK. A college isn't going to admit/reject her based on that. They get thousands of Captains and "Captains," she won't stand out.




Funny you mentioned that. A few years ago Yale got a student who wrote he was the "captain" of some sport. However, he was in reality was NOT. The REAL captain also applied to Yale and when they noticed there were two captains of the same team from the same school, they knew someone was lying. The school provided the advice Yale had asked for and one of the students was just flat out rejected for his lie.

And many schools will indeed do random checks or check anything that sounds suspicious.


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