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Discus: College Admissions: 2002 - 2003 Archive: July 2003 Archive: UT-Austin
By Orangeclock (Orangeclock) on Tuesday, July 22, 2003 - 09:50 am: Edit

Is there anyone out there who went to UT-Austin and had a class rank of 50%? I want to know if it can be done. I got a 1370 in he SAT, which puts me in their top 25%, but I realize class rank will hold me back.

By Teli (Teli) on Tuesday, July 22, 2003 - 08:55 pm: Edit

Good to see someone else from Texas on this board! What is your class rank? If you're not in the top 10%, you are up for major competition. The reason is because the majority of the spots there are taken by students in the top 10%, leaving very little room for highly qualified applicants. I know someone who made a 1500 on the SAT and got rejected from there simply because he wasn't in the top 10%. For you case, I think you should apply there and a backup school - may I suggest UT-Austin's major rival, Texas A&M.

Krish

By Xiggi (Xiggi) on Tuesday, July 22, 2003 - 09:25 pm: Edit

No kidding, Teli! Where did you get those numbers?

The reason is because the majority of the spots there are taken by students in the top 10%, leaving very little room for highly qualified applicants.

In a sense, 50% could be construed as the majority but I doubt that the other 50% fits in that "very little room". You may want to check some sources

Quoted from:

http://www.utexas.edu/student/research/reports/admissions/FaulknerStatement.htm

The Top 10 Percent Law (officially House Bill 588) guarantees that Texas high school graduates who rank in the top 10 percent of their senior class be admitted to any state institution of higher learning. Two years ago, 42 percent of UT Austin freshmen were top 10 percent graduates. This year, the figure is 47 percent. So, more than half the spaces in the freshman class remain available to non-top-10-percent graduates. Furthermore, because the freshman class has increased in size to more than 7,600, there are about as many spaces for non-top 10 percent graduates as in past years

For further research-and plenty of numbers-, check the UT site at

http://www.utexas.edu/student/research/reports/admissions/ResearchHome.htm

I know someone who made a 1500 on the SAT and got rejected from there simply because he wasn't in the top 10%.
If he was rejected with a 1500 it was NOT because he was not in the top 10% of his class but because his application must have contained derogatory information. regardless, that would be an oddity.

Here are the numbers from UT:

2002 SAT Ranges of Students entering with 10% rule:

<900 3%
900-990 6%
1000-1090 13%
1100-1190 19%
1200-1290 24%
1300-1390 22% <===== Top 37%
1400-1490 12%
1500+ 3%
SAT Mean 1226

2002 SAT Ranges for Regular admissions
<900 1%
900-990 3%
1000-1090 11%
1100-1190 24%
1200-1290 33%
1300-1390 20% <===== Top 28%
1400-1490 7%
1500+ 1%

SAT Mean 1222

For you case, I think you should apply there and a backup school - may I suggest UT-Austin's major rival, Texas A&M.

Would you care to elaborate? Are you intimitating that UT-Austin and Texas A&M have very different admission policies? Oh well!

By Teli (Teli) on Tuesday, July 22, 2003 - 10:56 pm: Edit

Take a look at http://bealonghorn.utexas.edu/bal/non_top_ten.WBX

"Although it's not possible to admit everyone who applies, each year, we do admit thousands of students who were not top 10% Texas graduates. In programs with enrollment limits, we give priority to applicants with the best qualifications. Some students are admitted to the University but not to the major to which they apply. For instance, the competition for spots in the McCombs School of Business and the College of Communication means that many more students apply to these schools than can be admitted."

I am not sure what the numbers exactly are at the moment, but unless I'm mistaken, I remember reading it was roughtly 70%-75%. However, take this into consideration: 50% of the applicants to Texas A&M are in the top 10% and we know there are a lot more top 10% applicants at UT than A&M.

As a matter of fact, UT is trying to get new legislation passed so that it can cap the amount of students in the top 10% they are required to accept.

As for Texas A&M, yes their admissions standards are different. You can be automatically admitted if you are in the top 50% of your class and you have at least a 1300 on the SAT or a 30 on the ACT. I had a hard time choosing between being a Longhorn or an Aggie. After careful consideration, I chose to be an Aggie, even though UT has a better reputation for academics because of the strong alumni network and the
family atmosphere. There is more meaning to wearing an Aggie ring than a Longhorn ring (which isn't really talked about that much to begin with). It's not necessarily what you know that gets you places but rather who you know.

Just some good for thought.

Krish

By Emyh (Emyh) on Wednesday, July 23, 2003 - 12:40 am: Edit

What is exactly UT's reputation in communications? I have never frankly heard much about their communication program in particular (and I live in Texas) but rather of other schools'... apparently it is supposed to be very good... is that true?

By Orangeclock (Orangeclock) on Wednesday, July 23, 2003 - 10:27 am: Edit

Actually, I had already though about applying to A&M as a backup school. I also though of UNT as another backup, even though I am sure to get in with class rank 272/540 and 1370. Though I am not quite in the top 50% yet, I will be easily by the time transcripts are sent.

About your friend with the 1500, is there anything else you can tell us about him/her? Are they a convicted child molestor or something? Did they not tkae all of the required courses? What else is there that we should know about?

I too have doubts about me getting in, despite my SAT scores. I read in an artical a representative making his case againt the 10% rule. He cited an example where a girl got a 1340 and in the top 13% of her class but didn't get into UT. Of course this was from a politician, so hes probably leaving out important details. Maybe that girl had committed a murder or something.

I am glad I have A&M as a back up school though. I am sure I will get in based on their 1300 rule (it seems there was a 1300 rule, but only at A&M, not for all texas schools. I would rather go to UT just because it is more well know and has more prestige.

I want to major in history and math, and possible economics. I am pretty sure you can do that just as well at either UT or A&M.

I also am interested in medical school. Will it be easier to get into a med school after going to UT?

Suppose a student from UT-Austin and another student from A&M had the same GPA, same class rank, same MCAT, same volunteer hours, etc., and both applied to the same medical school. Who would have a better chance of getting in?

I would like to see the SAT breakdown and GPA breakdown for non-top 10% applicants addmitted to UT. DO you know where that is, XIggi?

By Teli (Teli) on Wednesday, July 23, 2003 - 10:29 am: Edit

I am not sure. I do know that in general, that UT has the best programs in the state of Texas. You might want to do some research for an answer to your question.

Krish

By Xiggi (Xiggi) on Wednesday, July 23, 2003 - 11:02 am: Edit

Orange~

Did you click on the links I provided in this post and in your 1300 post?

The information is here. There are 28 pages in the report and it is very straightforward.

http://www.utexas.edu/student/research/reports/admissions/HB588-Report5.pdf

It is on the first page of the link I posted earlier.

http://www.utexas.edu/student/research/reports/admissions/ResearchHome.htm

TAMU has a bunch of research on the same subject but the information gets repetitive. As far as GAP and SAT, there is VERY little difference among the scores of the application. Both schools are worth researching because you should not go by name recognition solely but by checking the specific program you are interested in. Once you define your field, research the class sizes, teachers, possibilities to gain acceptance/access to the Honors program, flexibility in establishing your curriculum. Each school has its advantages and its weaknesses. I have to admit that I started as a 100% UT candidate and would not have consider Aggieland. That has changed considerably as I scratch more of the orange and crimson colors :)

By Teli (Teli) on Wednesday, July 23, 2003 - 01:47 pm: Edit

There was nothing wrong with my friend who got a 1500. There just wasn't any room left, so they rejected him (and if I remember correctly, he was wait-listed). Thats the top 10% rule for you!

"Suppose a student from UT-Austin and another student from A&M had the same GPA, same class rank, same MCAT, same volunteer hours, etc., and both applied to the same medical school. Who would have a better chance of getting in?"

Since they are the top two in the state of Texas, I'd say they both have an equal shot. What I've learned is that it doesen't matter where you go for your undergraduate program. (Graduate school is a different story though.) Do you plan to work in Texas? If so, you should consider that certain cities are dominated by either Aggies or Longhorns. For example, someone with a degree from A&M will have it a whole lot easier than a Longhorn in Houston because the Aggie alumni network is bigger and stronger. On the other hand, someone with a degree from UT-Austin will have it a whole lot easier than an Aggie in Dallas. I have an internship at a major company in Houston, and the ratio of Aggies to Longhorns is 50:1.

Krish


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