Are terror threats affecting your choice of school?





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Discus: College Search and Selection: August 2004 Archive: Are terror threats affecting your choice of school?
By Hayden (Hayden) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 05:18 pm: Edit

Are any of you letting the terror threats affect your choice of where to apply? For instance, is anyone deciding not to apply to universities in NY or DC because of threat potential?

By Miscgrl (Miscgrl) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 05:38 pm: Edit

Personally, my parents are really discouraging me from applying to schools in DC and London (we live in NYC so I didn't want to go to college here to begin with.) However, I'm interested in int'l relations, so DC is an obvious, so is the London School of Economics + Political Science.

While they'd love it if I decided to go to a small LAC or Dartmouth, somewhere hidden away, I refuse to make my decision with consideration of terror threats.

My parents are esp. worried b/c my high school was two blocks away from the 9/11 disaster - and thats kinda permanently traumatized them.

Having experienced that, I feel very strongly that ANY change in MY agenda based on fear is EXACTLY what the terrorists want - and not how I'm going to live my life.

But I think everyone has to make that choice.

By Hayden (Hayden) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 07:31 pm: Edit

Miscgrl -you say that 9/11 traumatized your parents. What did it do, or not do, to you? What was your experience?

And anyone else?

By Benjamin (Benjamin) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 07:56 pm: Edit

I was considering Georgetown, but my parents nipped that in the bud because its in DC. Also, they didn't like Chicago because, well, its in Chicago (even though not downtown)...so unless terrorists have a hatred for country music, I think I'll be safe in Nashville.

By Hayden (Hayden) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 08:11 pm: Edit

Benjamin - hehehehe. Good line.

By Miscgrl (Miscgrl) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 08:36 pm: Edit

While I really don't want to revisit that entire day - it taught me a lot of things - and most of all, made me appreciate everything a lot more. It certainly made me realize the true impact of politics and international relations as I'd never fully realized it before - my whole life I'd been interested in it but never seen the physical consequences.

9/11 was in every way as traumatizing for me as it was for my parents. But I became stronger, I learned a lot about being independent (esp in the face of danger - I had to find my way around Manhattan on my 4th day of freshman year - and it was the first time I'd even gone to the SCHOOL by myself - forget about knowing anything about the geography of Manhattan.)

I learned that to appreciate my grandpa constantly talking about Pearl Harbor - as 9/11 fades farther and farther from our memories, and it begins to appear in the newly printed textbooks - its become clear to me how important and significant events easily become boring history.

If you really want to know my experience of that day, its a long story.

It was my 4th day of attending high school, my first school outside of Queens. I woke up late (actually almost didn't go because I'd missed meeting my friend Debbie and I still didn't know exactly how to get to school - subways, buses and all.) I was taking the E train to the WTC, which is a bit farther than the A and C trains go (to Chambers St, closer to my school) but I figured I'd just walk. I happened to run into a guy I knew from jr high and he told me to transfer. I arrived at school 3 minutes before the first plane hit. I realized later on that if I had taken the E train, I would've been directly under the WTC at the time the first plane hit.

I went to my first class, a double period of Biology lab on the 7th floor. As I walked back from the lab table with my equipment I heard a low plane and just as I looked up through the window, I saw the plane hit the building. Everyone kept saying it was a bomb, but I had seen and I knew it was a plane. A few minutes later the principal came on over the PA to announce that a "small plane" had "accidentally" hit the WTC.

We were freaked out, but went on doing our first microscope lab.

Then, the second plane hit. I didn't see it, we all heard it. Running to the window, we realized that this was no accident. Our lab assistant freaked out (she had been in Israel on a bus when a bus bomb went off, and had decided to come to the US to ESCAPE terrorism.) Our other teacher simply closed the shades and tried to get us to all continue working on our lab.

Some people were crying and ran out of the room, some were actually laughing (which obviously sounds weird but its a strang kind of hysteric reaction when you're extremely scared and freaked out and in a state of disbelief.)

After that period ended, the principal told us all to report to our homerooms.

I ran downstairs to use a pay phone - but i was joined by at least a hundred other ppl wanting to make a call. A nice woman pulled me and a few others aside and said we could use the phones in her office. Turned out, however, that it was a shared line with the Principal who was on the phone with the FBI. There were bomb threats on our building, and there were bombsniffing dogs and FBI agents searching the buildng.

While waiting for the phone we watched the news - one of the channels had said there was a third plane heading towards NYC - that turned out to be a false rumor of course but we were frozen to the screen, waiting.

Finally I got to call my mother. I had thought she wouldn't have had heard because she would normally be running her business at home, on the internet, and wouldn't have heard the news.

However, my dad had phoned her after he found out. He was a teacher at a high school where some kid was listening to his walkman. My dad yelled at him to take the headphones off, and he said something about the WTC - While I really don't want to revisit that entire day - it taught me a lot of things - and most of all, made me appreciate everything a lot more. It certainly made me realize the true impact of politics and international relations as I'd never fully realized it before - my whole life I'd been interested in it but never seen the physical consequences.

9/11 was in every way as traumatizing for me as it was for my parents (who I couldn't contact until hours after they had heard of the attack.) I became stronger, I learned a lot about being independent (esp in the face of danger - I had to find my way around Manhattan on my 4th day of freshman year - and it was the first time I'd even gone to the SCHOOL by myself - forget about knowing anything about the geography of Manhattan.)

I learned that to appreciate my grandpa constantly talking about Pearl Harbor - as 9/11 fades farther and farther from our memories, and it begins to appear in the newly printed textbooks - its become clear to me how important and significant events easily become boring history.

If you really want to know my experience of that day, its a long story.

It was my 4th day of attending high school, my first school outside of Queens. I woke up late (actually almost didn't go because I'd missed meeting my friend Debbie and I still didn't know exactly how to get to school, subways, buses and all.) I was taking the E train to the WTC, which is a bit farther than the A and C trains go (to Chambers St, closer to my school) but I figured I'd just walk. I happened to run into a guy I knew from jr high and he told me to transfer. I arrived at school 3 minutes before the first plane hit. I realized later on that if I had taken the E train, I would've been directly under the WTC at the time the first plane hit.

I went to my first class, a double period of Biology lab on the 7th floor. As I walked back from the lab table with my equipment I heard a low plane and just as I looked up through the window, I saw the plane hit the building. Everyone kept saying it was a bomb, but I had seen and I knew it was a plane. A few minutes later the principal came on over the PA to announce that a "small plane" had "accidentally" hit the WTC.

We were freaked out, but went on doing our first microscope lab.

Then, the second plane hit. I didn't see it, we all heard it. Running to the window, we realized that this was no accident. Our lab assistant freaked out (she had been in Israel on a bus when a bus bomb went off, and had decided to come to the US to ESCAPE terrorism.) Our other teacher simply closed the shades and tried to get us to all continue working on our lab.

Some people were crying and ran out of the room, some were actually laughing (which obviously sounds weird but its a strang kind of hysteric reaction when you're extremely scared and freaked out and in a state of disbelief.)

After that period ended, the principal told us all to report to our homerooms.

I ran downstairs to use a pay phone - but i was joined by at least a hundred other ppl wanting to make a call. A nice woman pulled me and a few others aside and said we could use the phones in her office. Turned out, however, that it was a shared line with the Principal who was on the phone with the FBI. There were bomb threats on our building, and there were bombsniffing dogs and FBI agents searching the buildng.

While waiting for the phone we watched the news - one of the channels had said there was a third plane heading towards NYC - that turned out to be a false rumor of course but we were frozen to the screen, waiting.

Finally I got to call my mother. I had thought she wouldn't have had heard because she would normally be running her business at home, on the internet, and wouldn't have heard the news.

However, my dad had phoned her after he found out. He was a teacher at a high school where some kid was listening to his walkman. My dad yelled at him to take the headphones off, and he said something about the WTC - my dad told him to take the walkman off when what he said hit him. Two teachers had to hold him up and put him in a chair - my dad's 6'4" and built, but hearing the news he almost fainted.

Back to my phone call. I had been strong up till phoning my mom, but when she picked up she was in hysterics and starting crying at the sound of my voice. I started crying too. She told me to get the hell out of the school and run uptown as far as I could go and I told her the school wasn't allowing anyone out. My mom said the towers were gonna fall and that if they fell over, they would fall on my school. I tried to calm her down and told her I would phone in an hour. A silly promise considering no cellphones or payphones in the area were working - all the antennaes were on top of the WTC buildings.

I got back up to homeroom, and then the first tower fell. Up until then the administration had thought we were safer inside (people who were injured were taken to our building for safety) but now that the buildings were falling, it was clear we had to evacuate. Luckily, the towers did not fall over (as my mom had thought they would, and as they said they would on the news) but imploded on themselves.

I was also lucky to be on the 3rd floor so I got a rush start. While most of us walked, I ran. The people who had evacuated from the 10th floor got caught in the huge smoke and dust cloud of the second tower falling - I just saw it in the distance.

When I finally found a working payphone on Chelsea Piers, I called my mom again and she told me I had to go to my cousin's apartment on the lower east side - I had only been there once in my life. We had no other contacts in Manhattan.

I had to leave everyone from my school, who were too afraid to go back downtown, even if on the other side of Manhattan.

To this day I don't know how but I managed to find my way by foot to my cousin's house. I stayed until 8 PM that day - and when still no taxis could be found, I took the subway home.

It was extraordinarily eerie - only one Chinese family on the train and I'm not sure they knew what had happened.

I literally jumped for joy when we got to the first stop in Queens.

My bus home was detoured because we live near a polic precinct and no traffic was allowed in a 5 block radius of it. But I finally got home and seeing my family was the most unbelievably relieving thing I had ever experienced.

We didn't have school for weeks. They used our building for triage, and then the air quality was in doubt (in fact it still is.) We spent a month or so at Brooklyn Tech before we got back to our school (Stuyvesant.)

To this day the whole experience seems surreal - so I don't really know how it affected me. I don't think of the objects I saw jumping from windows as people simply because its unfathomable. The entire day really was.


Sorry for the morbid post, ya kinda asked for it.

Its really strange but I'm as "over it" as I guess one can ever be.

Now I'm just trying to focus on getting to play a part in the international system of diplomacy that can perhaps prevent another 9/11 from ever happening again.

Thanks for reading, if you bothered.

By Xiggi (Xiggi) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 08:50 pm: Edit

I would never apply to UC-Berkeley. Terror has been threatening there for about 40 years. :)

By Yodisistim (Yodisistim) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 08:59 pm: Edit

Well I have to be honest. I had to reconsider NYU in terms of terrorism and after that, NYU was checked off the list. However, it wasn't the main deciding factor.

By Dazed04confused (Dazed04confused) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 09:05 pm: Edit

You can not run from terror your entire life. If you choose to run from terror and not apply to a school in a more urban location, it is probably reflective of the way you are going to live your life: comfortable, unaffected and sheepish

By Hayden (Hayden) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 09:28 pm: Edit

Miscgrl - yes, I "kinda asked for it". And yes, I did bother to read it. And it brought tears to my eyes. Thank you for sharing the story.

I posed this question because I am still very affected by 9/11 myself. Not as close as you physically, but I was close to many, many people who died there - way too many.

So now my d is interested in applying to NYU and I have to balance my concerns for her future, against her plans for her future. I just don't know what the right things to do is.

By Miscgrl (Miscgrl) on Monday, August 09, 2004 - 11:05 pm: Edit

Hayden - I'm very sorry to hear about your connections with the 9/11 tragedy. While I might have been physically there, I was lucky enough to get out unscathed, and fortunate enough to not know anyone directly who lost their life there.

My dad feels the same way about me wanting to go to Georgetown University in DC, esp since I obviously want to do internships there and all.

One traumatic terror experience has been enough for him, obviously for me as well.

But honestly, while everyone has the right to make judgements based on how they feel intuitively about future attacks, when you make a judgement because of threats of terror, you let the terrorists win.

They're succeeding because WE aren't taking advantage of the opportunities and freedoms that America has given us because WE are now scared of THEM.

However, its understandable that thats all very idealistic and if (god forbid) something happened, we would all feel stupid and angry that we let ourselves or our loved ones be put in that situation.

There's no wrong or right answer. Personally, because of the nature of what I want to study (int'l relations) and because of the type of environment I enjoy; I will probably end up in either DC or London. My parents are not liking it much, and I'm certainly not doing it to prove anything. I just feel like this is what I'm supposed to do, what I want to do, and nothing is going to stop me.

Also, maybe this is just me but on 9/11 there was no way in hell anyone was expecting something like that. Ditto with the '93 trade center attacks. I feel like as long as we're scared and taking extra precaution, etc., the terrorists are still enjoying their winnings from the 9/11 attacks. It's when we go completely back to normal with terrorism as the last thing on our minds again that (in my opinion) we're more likely to be attacked.

Obviously this is just my intuition, and, unfortunately, you and your daughter face a difficult decision (as I probably will as well... though I think I've made up my mind.)

By Yodisistim (Yodisistim) on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 12:19 am: Edit

If you choose to run from terror and not apply to a school in a more urban location, it is probably reflective of the way you are going to live your life: comfortable, unaffected and sheepish

Probably is the key word in that sentence. I have lived in an major urban area for almost all of my life and until recently, it has been named one of "proposed" spots for attack. So not only when I visit, I have to worry about wearing the wrong color because of the high gang violence rate, but I have to worry about the Predential Bank building being blown up too. That's right; urban Newark, NJ; not to be played with. NYC is only about half an hour away on train and considering that I dont have a car and a lot of trains are sometimes delayed because of mysterious packages, I realized that I rather live without the thought in back of my mind. I currently live in a suburban area and I have adpated quite fine. I may not be able to speak for everyone else, but sometimes living in an urban city may change your outlook on things, but there are so many types of environments that people are unexposed to and some people turn out fine. IMHO I don't think it's a factor of being scared, I think it's a factor of being safer than you would have you chosen DC, or NY.

By Alongfortheride (Alongfortheride) on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 09:03 am: Edit

The tragedy of 9/11, when foreign terrorists attacked out country was a devestating event. So was the home-grown terrorist attack in the Oklahoma City bombing. One was an attack on the financial and governmental centers of the country. The other, from all evidence was a crime against a convenient location designed to shock the country - and it did. The fact is that we now live in a changed world. My son is going to school in a city with a busy seaport, and it gets my attention when terrorist alerts come out for the ports. I don't have any answers. I just wish that we lived in a world where it wasn't a consideration in your college choice.

By Rockstar (Rockstar) on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 01:01 pm: Edit

are you kidddding? Worrying about terror threats on your college campus is ridiculous. You are no more unsafe going to NYU (where I'm going) than you would be at a school in rural arkansaw (there could be a freak tornado accident! ahhhhhh!). There hasn't been any terrorist attacks in the US since sept 11, and certainly none on college campuses. Get over it. Don't live in fear.

By Emeraldkity4 (Emeraldkity4) on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 02:07 pm: Edit

The National Center for health statistics reports that
nearly 3,000 people died in 9/11 attacks.
The same year 43,788 died in motor vehicle accidents, 30,622 by suicide,20,306 were murdered ( including 11.348 by firearms),
14,078 died by accidental poisoning and 3,021 died f complications from medical care.
In addition, 700,000 Americans died from heart disease the #1 killer and 553,768 died from cancer and 32,238 from blood poisoning.
If you are going to limit your choices because of the risk that you might be where a terroist will strike, you might as well not get out of bed.

By Sac (Sac) on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 02:49 pm: Edit

My S chose a college in NYC and I'd be lying if I didn't admit to feeling my chest tightening every time I think about terrorism and imagine him there next year. I do think NYC is still a target. On the other hand, it is one of many that have been mentioned, including Seattle, the LA airport, Chicago, bridges in the Bay Area, and probably any major building anywhere that is obviously linked with Judiasm.

It's just impossible to play the odds on this. Sometimes, when I imagine him at one of the other colleges which he almost chose, I picture him on that nice, safe, suburban campus and think I would have been less anxious. Then I remember he would have wanted to get off that campus sometimes. At least with him in NYC, I won't be worrying about freeway accidents or drinking and driving.

By Alongfortheride (Alongfortheride) on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 04:35 pm: Edit

Emeraldkity, you have a point. It's like not wanting to fly, ride on a bus or take a ferry after you've heard about a multi-fatility event. Given the numbers of people that travel using those modes of transportation, the odds are small that something could happen. Much less than driving your car. Risk is inherent. I just hate that we now live in a time where this is even a topic to discuss.

By Hayden (Hayden) on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 10:36 pm: Edit

Emeraldkiy4 - I understand your point, and it's true more than 43K people died in car accidents, and 30K died by suicide. But how many of those people were driving too fast, or driving drunk? and the suicides - well it goes without saying that that's in your own control. In other words, many of the deaths in this country could be prevented by things you can control by not getting drunk, not smoking, etc.

And more importantly to a mom - all those people weren't the daughter I'm responsible for. (I don't expect you students to fully appreciate that yet, but I know you parents will.)

I should add that my son attends university in DC! So I feel NYC would just double our chances of something horrible.

I'll probably let her go, if she gets in. Remember the story of the man who saw Death on the street, so he jumped on his horse and galloped like crazy to another town to escape. And then Death loomed up in front of him and said "I was surprised to see you back there, since I knew we had an appointment here." So you never know.

By Candi1657 (Candi1657) on Tuesday, August 10, 2004 - 11:44 pm: Edit

It is undeniable how much impact 9/11 has had on us New Yorkers, and the nation in general.

I was in math class when I discovered that two planes had hit the towers. We found it in an odd way, we felt the ground shake, but it felt so slight that few remarked on it. We didn't actually know what had happened when a firefighter came on the loudspeaker and told us to stay calm and in our seats.

We wondered why we would be given such an odd command, seemingly out of the middle of nowhere. Within 15 minutes, however, we were told what had happened. Some people cried. I was frozen in disbelief.

Then the panic began. We were told on the loudspeaker to lock our classroom doors, admitting no one and allowing no one to leave. Teachers were told to shut all of the windows, because of a possibility of biological weapons in the air. We were also told to stay away from the windows and huddle in the middle of the classroom. I can't say that I was ever more genuinely terrified in my entire life than I was at this point.

When the panic subsided, there was the problem of having no available transportation to take kids home. People like me, (who lived in upper Manhattan) were told to walk home. Some did. I vehemently refused, because there is no way that with my medical problems I was going to be able to walk 121 blocks to get to my house. In late afternoon, however, the A train started running again.

I walked all the way back to the A train, which was not my usual train, but I was obviously desparate to get home.

There was dead silence in the streets. People were walking as if in a haze. When I got into the train station, it was ridiculously overcrowded, to the point people were standing very near to the edge of the platform. We waited for the train for a couple of hours, and it got to the point I could no longer stand and I sat down on the platform. I sat huddled with my knees clutched, because there wasn't much room around me.

I made it home, though, and was happy to embrace my family.

This experience made me realize how awful the nature of terror is, and how if I thought that this was rough, it could never compare to those who fought to live in the Towers that day and the hurt and anguish their relatives must have felt.

I can't say, however, that living in fear of another terror attack is the way to approach one's life. I live in NYC, and after I return from Yale, I hope to continue living there. Living in fear only paralyzes you and emboldens terrorists.

Just my two cents.

By Hayden (Hayden) on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 01:02 am: Edit

Thank you, Candi. I was not in NY at the time. I was in my office out of the city. Our computers went blank. A few people out on the floor muttered and complained, but we generally turned to some other task. Then an employee went running through the office shouting that a plane had hit the WTC. We all started to exclaim. Someone said it must have been a small plane. Then another employee ran into the office saying her husband just called. "The tower is hit, it's two planes." We grouped together and started counting heads. Where's John, he was going in for the meeting? Where's Susan, wasn't she going too? Wait - Frank's on the phone - he says Susan was going to NY today for a big meeting - was she there, please tell me she wasn't there, please Oh god, please tell me she's not there. We found a radio. The Pentagon had been hit. Now they're saying there's another one. Oh, god where's Mark? Someone get their calendars. I called my husband - please go home, you might be next. No, he said, but are you watching TV? No, we can't get any reception. "I'm sorry, but I think you whole NY office might be gone." Oh, please don't say that, oh god please don't say that.

"Did you see Sam leaving? He was crying." "Yes, they had to drive him home because his wife was in the building." "oh, no, her too?" "They're all there today."

We don't know whether to go home or stay together like a family. We go home. The sky was so beautiful. All clear and blue. Cloudless except for the large plume of smoke drifting across the horizon.

The school calls. They won't release our kids until a family member comes to get them. Sorry, they explain, but we have to make sure the kids don't walk home and are by themselves when they realize they may have lost a parent." "Okay, I'll be right there." But it's hard to drive when you're crying.

I watched TV all day to see the towers go down. Every time they replayed it, I stopped what I was doing to see it again. I realize that I'm in denial, and I'm watching because I'm hoping the ending will be different.

The next day I drive to work. I pass lots of commuter parking lots. The cars left there overnight belong to the people who never made it home.

Our office is quiet, people grouped together. A Muslim employee slinks in, not sure if he will be welcome. Someone puts an arm around him, and he starts to cry. They were your friends too, we tell him.

"How many?" "Not sure, maybe couple of hundred. Plane hit too early, that saved a lot of people." Mark? Susan? Don't know. The husband has called about a hundred times. We have nothing to tell him. Like me, he just kept calling in hopes the answer would change.

Employees from our NY office have arrived and are milling around, no place else to go. Someone runs into the office where we're talking. "We're taking a collection." One of the guys takes out his wallet. An inch of gray dust had clogged his wallet. We're silent as he brushes off the dust and takes out some money. That's where our friends are, I thought to myself. Our colleagues and all those people are dust in the fireman's clothes, and in the pockets, shoes and hair of everyone who got out. They're wearing our friends.

We inventoried the people. How about Paul, anyone hear from Paul? Tom- was he there? oh, god oh god not them too.

I can't tell you how many we lost without id'ing the company. It was a lot.

A couple of weeks later, I was walking by a man at his desk with his head down. His shoulders were shaking. I paused. Do I walk by, pretend I don't see it? Will it embarrass him if I stop? I stop, and put my arm around his shoulders. I don't say anything. After a while, he raised his head a little. "You know they say if you jump off a really high building, that you die before you hit the ground?" I nod, "Yes, I've heard that." He started crying again. "It's not true. They were looking at me. It's not true, it's not true." I just hugged him in silence. He was listening to too many voices to want to hear mine.

I'm sorry, I guess this was too long for anyone to read, so none of you have made it this far. But I just started remembering, and I've never put this into words before. Good night and God bless.

By Innotof (Innotof) on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 01:33 am: Edit

I live in California, so I didn't find out about the 9/11 stuff until after both of the towers had been hit. I had woken up at about 6:30 am, and I turned on the radio as usual. The DJ's (who are usually cracking jokes all the time) were very somber and grave, and pretty soon the news lady came on and talked about the attacks (which most no one had identified yet as attacks). Of course I was shocked that the WTC had been hit, but I natuirally thought it was only the result of an aircraft malfunction. Well, the news minute ended, and the DJ's were just about to play another song when the news lady came running back to the mic and announced that the Pentagon had been hit. I think I just about fell over when she said that. At that point, I knew it was terrorism.

By Tlaktan (Tlaktan) on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 01:47 am: Edit


Quote:

I would never apply to UC-Berkeley. Terror has been threatening there for about 40 years.


- Xiggi. You are totally right about that one, Xig.

And Miscgrl: I hope to be joining you @ Georgetown this fall, regardless of terrorists or not. Our nation's capitol is one of the most beautiful places to be in, regardless of terrorist threats .. or not.

By Miscgrl (Miscgrl) on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 11:13 am: Edit

Hayden- Yes, I made it through your story. Thats really intense - esp the way you wrote it out, i felt like i was there. Tho no matter how many stories I hear and things I remember its still hard for me to admit it was all real.

Writing out your story like that has a certain fairly therapeutic effect in the end tho, doesn't it? It kinda lets it all out...I think its healthy. Or as healthy as one can make oneself after such an experience, in any case.

Tiaktan - I'm applying this fall to Georgetown, so I don't know if I'll make it in yet. But if I do, I look forward to seeing you there next fall!

By M87 (M87) on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 12:27 pm: Edit

"I would never apply to UC-Berkeley. Terror has been threatening there for about 40 years."

Really?
Oh goodie. Then I should definitely put UC-Berkeley (legacy/dream school) as first on my appplication rather than second.

I was born during a war, in a country that was indirectly literally 'showered' with bombs by the terrorists (aka. the United States). Although I was in fact much too young to remember any of the events, I feel as if the sound of the bombs are forever imprinted in my memory.

How do I know this? You know how everyone enjoys fireworks, I've personally always loved looking at them from a distance, but one time I was very near to an area, during a celebration, where there was fireworks. Everytime they let go of one, it literally made my heart sink. After SO MANY years, all I could think of were -bombs. That was a fun night. /rolls eyes

But no, I've lived, I've survived, and I honestly don't give a damn. Everybody is a terrorist now-a-days, if I let that get to me hat will I have left? What disgusts me though, is people who are ruled by fear, people who have never had to deal with a day's hardship and enjoy sitting on their fat asses while people elsewhere in the world are suffering. 'Sheep' people who think the world owes something to them. I find it funny, and pathetic (aka. many americans) at the same time... wait, I could go on with this but why bother?

In short to your question. No I don't care.

By Techiedork (Techiedork) on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 12:44 pm: Edit

well. i lived in California during 9/11 and had watched the 2nd plane hit and both towers fall on live television feed before i even left for school. it obviously had a different impact on the west coast. we felt more disconnected from it, and the only concerns we really had were "would they try to hit the DLI/Presidio" and "what about the golden gate bridge?" (on which they stationed a hummer and two national guardsmen at either end...all in camo)

but now i live in DC and have for the past 2 years. if anything, the people that live in the area just find it a nuisance when they highten the terror alerts beacuse it means they have to take detours and roads are closed. and since then you have to go through a metal detector almost everywhere you go it seems. and you essentially can't park cars in front of fedral buildings. so in terms of terror attacks, DC is actually pretty protected. the only concerns me or my parents have ever had are with the metro. and all i'm told is just to be careful.

but you shouldn't not apply to a school in a metropolitan area because of terror alerts. georgetown is in probably one of THE safest and nicest areas of DC, and about as far removed from any federal buildings as you can be. there's no reason not to apply to the other schools in the area either.

By Tlaktan (Tlaktan) on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 02:10 pm: Edit

Sorry Miscgrl, I meant NEXT Fall Semester.

By Pookdogg (Pookdogg) on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 02:28 pm: Edit

As a Californian living in the golf capital of Monterey, I found myself almost totally disconnected from the 9/11 attacks. On that Tuesday morning, some of my more insensitive classmates were celebrating because classes were cancelled. Unlike most of America, the students at my school had almost no direct links to anyone who would even be in Manhattan, much less in the WTC.

Of course, as the catastrophic number of dead began to seep in, those poor saps who laughed and played football out on the field while others watched their televisions in stunned horror realized the extent of the tragedy. Shame gave way to anger, which quickly gave way to fear. We house the Defense Language Institute, the Monterey Presidio, and the Naval Postgraduate School, all tactically viable military targets? Sure, all the attacks were on the East Coast, but still...

Thankfully, nothing else happened (yet). And I think that the majority of my classmates have reverted back to their old pre-9/11 ways, which is a blessing and a curse, of course. I myself am working in the Naval Postgraduate School, a research assisstant based on the top floor of the main building. Sure, security has become increasingly lax around the complex, but I somewhat half-heartedly stopped caring.

Over the last spring I decided to matriculate to Berkeley over NYU despite the generous FinAid package offered by NYU. Not because of terror, though: no, the thought never even crossed my mind. Now that I mention it to myself, however, I do wonder about the apathy and general cynicism that appears to have set in among us West Coasters (myself included). Should we be considering the threats more seriously?

By Tropicanabanana (Tropicanabanana) on Wednesday, August 11, 2004 - 04:34 pm: Edit

There was an attack on a campus. I remember a random bomb blew up part of a mailroom at Yale Law School a year or so ago. I never remembered why that happened....Anyone remember that?

By Dazed04confused (Dazed04confused) on Thursday, August 12, 2004 - 07:24 am: Edit

I think the more important issue may be finding a school regardless of location where there is a supportive community in the wake of terrorism or national threats or the like whether it is in Williamstown, MA or Grinnel, IA, or New York, NY. If students were choosing schools based on "perceived threats," then NYU may not be the hottest school in the country. Don't live your life in fear: YOU HAVE ONE LIFE, MAKE IT EXCEPTIONAL!!!


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