TOP 20 Premed schools





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Discus: College Search and Selection: August 2004 Archive: TOP 20 Premed schools
By Teddygraham540 (Teddygraham540) on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 01:45 pm: Edit

Just wondering, what would you guys say is the top 20 premed schools in the nation? Med School?

By Mini (Mini) on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 01:58 pm: Edit

If you are good enough to get into any of the so-called top 20 premed schools (if such a thing exists), it isn't going to matter where you go -- if you do the work, you'll get into med. school (which is getting easier and easier all the time.) The students who get into med school from the largest feeder schools would likely have gotten into med school had they gone elsewhere (and, maybe, easier, 'cause their grades would have been higher.)

By Hubbellgardner (Hubbellgardner) on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 02:04 pm: Edit

also depends on whether you want the colleges who send the most in 'absolute' numbers(favors mega-universities) or those that send the highest percentage of their premeds(highest per capita acceptance rate) which favors the elite colleges(top LAC's in particular). For example, PENN State might send 50 to medical school, but their acceptance rate among their hundreds of premeds might be 30% or less; and a college like Swarthmore, Franklin and Marshall, Davidson, Middlebury might send around 20 to medical school each year with a 90%+ acceptance rate

By Mini (Mini) on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 02:15 pm: Edit

Also depends whether schools work hard to screen out their potentially weaker med. school applicants, as many LACs do. A lower-ranking potential pre-med who is discourged at a prestigious LAC might be the top of the heap at a less competitive school.

In other words, who knows? In recent years, roughly half of all Williams music majors have gone to med school, which is higher than their percentage of biology majors who have gone to med school.

By Im_Blue (Im_Blue) on Thursday, July 29, 2004 - 10:06 pm: Edit

I read in the UC Davis course catalog that "According to the American Medical Association, the undergraduate major with the highest rate of acceptance into medical school is not chemistry or physics, but music."

By Teddygraham540 (Teddygraham540) on Sunday, August 01, 2004 - 01:54 pm: Edit

im sorry that came out wrong. what do u guys think are the top 20 colleges for people who want to go on a premed track or in other words colleges with good science programs

By Alexandre (Alexandre) on Sunday, August 01, 2004 - 02:26 pm: Edit

Although there is not such thing as a "pre-med" major, some universities are better at sending students to medical school than others.

The following schools all have a 90% or better admission rate into med schools:

Amherst
Brown
Cal-Berkeley**
Carleton
Chicago*
Columbia**
Cornell**
Dartmouth
Davidson
Duke*
Emory*
Harvard**
Haverford
Johns Hopkins**
Middlebury
Michigan-Ann Arbor**
Northwestern*
Notre Dame
Penn**
Pomona
Princeton
Stanford**
Swarthmore
Texas-Austin*
UCLA**
UNC
Vanderbilt**
Washington University-St Louis**
Williams
Wisconsin-Madison
Yale**

Universities with * have top 25 medical schools. Universities with ** have top 10 medical schools.

By Fuzzzylogicc (Fuzzzylogicc) on Sunday, August 01, 2004 - 02:56 pm: Edit

Not that it much matters, but it seems odd that you gave Duke one asterisk. It's usually ranked top 10, if not top 5, among med schools.

By Rutger818 (Rutger818) on Sunday, August 01, 2004 - 03:06 pm: Edit

A minor correction: Cal-Berkeley does not have a medical school, nor does Texas-Austin.

By Ksolo (Ksolo) on Sunday, August 01, 2004 - 03:13 pm: Edit

Beware of statistics of students getting into medical schools. Many schools have pre-med students, but what the stats dont say is that not EVERY premed student is allowed to apply to medical school directly out of undergrad.

So for instance, School A, may have 100 pre-med students. Yet, only less than 7 applied to medical school during their senior year. This is because the prestigious schools typically will only recommend a few students (so that the schools acceptance rate stays high). The rest of the 93 who didnt apply, are usually told to wait a year or more before applying, so that the school doesnt have to include it in their stats. And even then, the schools are quite stringent on who they recommend.

If each and every premed student applied, stats wouldnt be so high at any of the top universities. And keep in mind that the average age of accepted med applicants is about 28 or so.

By Alexandre (Alexandre) on Sunday, August 01, 2004 - 03:22 pm: Edit

Fuzzylogic, Duke is a top 5 Medical school. I should have put ** next to it.

Rutgers, UCSF is affiliated to UC Berkeley. And UT Southwestern Medical Center is affiliated to UT Austin. Those two are top 10-15 medical schools.

By Rutger818 (Rutger818) on Sunday, August 01, 2004 - 03:52 pm: Edit

I'm aware of the affiliations. But to avoid possible confusion, I was just pointing out that Berkeley and Austin do not have their own medical schools.

Unlike the other asteriked campuses, UC-Berkeley and UT-Austin are limited to undergraduates, while UCSF and UT Southwestern are limited to gradute level studies.

By Admissionsrep (Admissionsrep) on Tuesday, August 03, 2004 - 07:10 pm: Edit

Haverford Colllege is the underrated gem on this list. Haverford is one heckuva school for medical research, biology and pre-Med.

By Mini (Mini) on Tuesday, August 03, 2004 - 07:29 pm: Edit

Besides checking for which school screens out less capable applicants (as my alma mater Williams used to do - and most of those screened out could quite easily have gone to med school had they come from a different college or university), you also have to screen for family income. Going to any professional school (for which they are very few scholarships) requires a willingness to take on (more) debt, if you or your family can't pay for it out of pocket.

Getting into med. school has gotten easier and easier over the past 10 years. The bigger question is whether you can afford it, and whether it is even desirable. (If you carry lots and lots of debt from your undergraduate years, it is even more difficult.) At Yale, for example, the percentage of students going to med school after graduation has dropped from 17% in 1975 to 6% in 2002, a decline of 65%! (And I think you'll find similar, though smaller, drops at all the Ivies.) Does that mean educational quality at Yale has dropped precipitiously? Not likely. What is more likely is that a smaller percentage of students are able/willing to take on the debt load and/or they found other career paths more desirable.

My suspicion is that if there were a way to correct for family income/student debt, and for the screening out of applicants, one might find that virtually none of the "best premed" schools are on the list above (and might include places like Earlham, Hope, Kalamazoo, Western Washington University, SUNY-Binghampton, and Brigham Young, just to name a few.)

By Alexandre (Alexandre) on Tuesday, August 03, 2004 - 07:38 pm: Edit

Admissionsrep, I totally agree regarding Haverford. I put it on my list above. It is an awesome, AWESOME college with a great Biology/pre-med track. Davidson is also great in that regard.

By Robyrm (Robyrm) on Tuesday, August 03, 2004 - 08:03 pm: Edit

MIT....everyone works at least as hard as the pre-meds...unparalleled research opporunities ...plus, most importantly- you learn to think analytically- and as a result, medical school (the scientific parts) will be a breeze thereafter...and the practice of medicine will be natural to your thinking style...

As to top med schools- it depends entirely on where you think you want to go afterwards. If you want to do research and be a professor at Harvard or Mayo or whatever, you would be well advised to go to a medical school with similar name recognition. If you want to practice pediatrics in your home town, go to your state medical school and save the money...You will be just as well trained, at a fraction of the cost..

By Oldman (Oldman) on Tuesday, August 03, 2004 - 08:11 pm: Edit

Robyrm is correct re: state med school is the way to go for private practice.

By Jamimom (Jamimom) on Tuesday, August 03, 2004 - 08:22 pm: Edit

I am not sure how to judge a school as a good "premed" school with readily available numbers. The % accepted to med school does not hold water for me, for reasons explained by previous posters. A more accurate statistic would be the number of kids who end up accepted at a med school over those who started out premed. Attrition should be compensated by those who changed into the major. Can't come up with any such figures anywhere. Johns Hopkins, a college which always comes up on any top premed school list has many, many kids starting out as natural science, chem, bio, or side pocket premed. Most of them do not even make it to Committee which then further cuts the ranks.

And yet Hopkins is a great premed school. For a top student with great interests in the natural sciences, the opportunities are limitless. Hopkins premed lead the list in many of the top medical schools, and for research doctors, it is hard to find better. The problem is if you do not fit that profile but may make a danged fine doctor, your chances of getting into any med school are compromised.

So the answer is the same as it is for many questions of what is best or better. It really depends on the student. For some kids the best choice is Duke, Hopkins, Rochester, some tough research route. For others the LAC brings out the best in them. Some kids do just fine at a large state school and end up with a heck of a lot less debt than someone who goes the $45k a year undergrad route. If you get into a guaranteed program, it can take off a lot of pressure a make things smoother, if you change your mind about things, you could be stuck. So it really depends on a number of factors.

By Bmurry (Bmurry) on Wednesday, August 04, 2004 - 05:29 pm: Edit

Those ppl going to med school should keep in mind that most state med schools only accept residents of that state into the med school. So if you go away for college you should consider the applicant pool in both states which you would be competing against for those spots.

By Dk92487 (Dk92487) on Monday, September 06, 2004 - 01:04 am: Edit

doesnt Muhlenberg have a high acceptance rate to med school?


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