Best potential schools for a future English major





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Discus: College Search and Selection: April 2004 Archive: Best potential schools for a future English major
By Mparking (Mparking) on Sunday, April 11, 2004 - 02:46 am: Edit

Does anyone know what the best schools are to go to to study English (especially with Creative Writing as a minor)? I tried searching on US News, but I guess that list was one of the "pay first" options...

By Carolyn (Carolyn) on Sunday, April 11, 2004 - 01:19 pm: Edit

Here's a list from The College Guide -
Top programs in Endlish

Amherst
Beloit
Bennington
Brandeis
Brown
Bryn Mawr
UCBerkeley
Carleton
U of Chicago
Columbia U
Cornell
Dartmouth
U of Denver
Dickinson College
Duke
Harvard
Haverford
U of Iowa
Johns Hopkins
Kenyon
Knox College (IL)
U of Michigan Ann Arbor
Middlebury College
Mt. Holyoke
U of North Carolina - Chapel Hill
Oberlin
U of Pennsylvania
Pomona
PRinceton
Reed
Smith
Stanford
Swarthmore
U of Virginia
Wesleyan
Whitman
Williams
Wofford
Yale U

To this list, I'd personally add: Tufts, Trinity College (CT), U of Oregon, Emerson, Denison, Cornell, Bucknell, UC Irvine, U of Arizona, Grinnell, Hamilton, Washington U in St. Louis,
Washington College (MD), Wittenberg College (OH)
but there are also many other schools with fine English departments out there.

Hope this helps.

By Collegeparent (Collegeparent) on Sunday, April 11, 2004 - 01:21 pm: Edit

As usual, Carolyn offers a great list. I'd also add Connecticut College, Sarah Lawrence and Vassar.

By Brownalum (Brownalum) on Sunday, April 11, 2004 - 06:07 pm: Edit

Yale has the best English department, by far. You should also consider the schools on Carolyn's list - particularly Princeton and Cornell. Wellesley should also be on that list.

By Carolyn (Carolyn) on Sunday, April 11, 2004 - 06:20 pm: Edit

And also, Bard has a good English department. And yes, the others as well. Lewis & Clark, Whitman College, Occidental, and Pomona are also west coast schools with good English departments.

Since EVERY school has an English department, the best bet is to compare the number of faculty, their interests, the number of English majors, and finally, to really do a detailed comparison of the courses offered - not just what is listed in the catalog, but the actual semester to semester course offerings. I'd also look at class sizes - are most of the English classes discussion size or are they larger? And, how many upper level English classes are offered (I notice that some schools seem to concentrate on freshman English comp classes and offer relatively little in upper division classes). All of this should help you sort through the options.

By Enzom (Enzom) on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 08:25 am: Edit

KENYON

By Acampbel (Acampbel) on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 12:38 pm: Edit

Does anyone have any input on the English/Creative writing program at Union College?? How about internship opps?

By Mjmatrix (Mjmatrix) on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 01:16 pm: Edit

Princeton, UNC-Chapel Hill, and Kenyon transcend that list in terms of creative writing.

I am in the same boat as yourself; I have presently narrowed my search to Yale and Stanford (disliking small, liberal arts colleges and Princeton's repulsive social atmosphere of eating clubs). I will likely apply early to Stanford, which, by the way, has an excellent creative writing program (Amy Tan is speaking twice today on campus).

What I did was check the US News Graduate School Rankings for both fields, then I narrowed my list based on which schools are known to focus on undergrads (Harvard's obviously not my first choice, especially after reading an article in The Crimson about a girl who never got into any creative writing class to which she applied). The horrible thing is, she had gone to Harvard after considering its creative writing program as a criterium.

By Collegeparent (Collegeparent) on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 02:35 pm: Edit

Criterion.

By Imac7477 (Imac7477) on Monday, April 12, 2004 - 02:58 pm: Edit

Princeton has arguably the best program in Creative Writing...they have on the faculty the likes of Toni Morrison and Joyce Carol-Oates, who are said to actually teach the undergraduates.

By Mparking (Mparking) on Friday, April 16, 2004 - 01:18 am: Edit

Thanks alot for the input everyone! It's helped out alot; I did some research and composed a list of roughly 7, 8 colleges. I've been having a tough time looking for schools, especially since I'm from Texas and all the schools here are obsessed with engineering and technology. I also have this need to just get away and experience something new and different--I guess it's part of the writer's development, you could say.

By 1214 (1214) on Wednesday, April 21, 2004 - 04:31 pm: Edit

Brown has, in recent years, produced cutting-edge, unique writers and dramatists like Nilo Cruz, Edwidge Danticat, and Jeffrey Eugenides.


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