List college acceptances: Asking advice on selection





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Discus: College Search and Selection: March 2004 Archive: List college acceptances: Asking advice on selection
By Sgiovinc (Sgiovinc) on Tuesday, March 30, 2004 - 01:40 pm: Edit

Colleges accepted:

Stevens Institute of Tech
Georgia Tech
SUNY Geneseo
Tulane Engineering
Carnegie Mellon MCS

Where should I go, in order please, for Sciences....thanks...middle class female, no financial aid.

By Brownalum (Brownalum) on Tuesday, March 30, 2004 - 11:17 pm: Edit

What kind of sciences? What do you want to do after college and what region of the country would you like to live in?

By Arizonamom (Arizonamom) on Tuesday, March 30, 2004 - 11:48 pm: Edit

Accepted so far: Tulane honors, ASU and Uof A honors, Claremont-McKenna, Emory, Trinity University, waitlisted WUSTL, pending Duke, Pomona, Rice Main goal is getting into a good PhD program in psych. and having good research opportunities.Any thoughts on best choices from those accepted at so far. Have merit at Tulane, Trinity, and 3 honors programs. Am most interested in Emory, Claremont and Trinity at this point. Of course would add Pomona and Duke to the mix but that's a big IF. Thanks for input

By Collegeparent (Collegeparent) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 06:30 am: Edit

Arizonamom, once everything's in, then you can decide. And it's Trinity TX, not CT? Get back later in the week. Personal preference so far: Claremont.

By Franche (Franche) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 01:45 pm: Edit

I want to mayor in physics, which one should I go?
Brown U.
Yale
Reed College
U illinois at Urbana
UCBERK
or UBC in canada?
please help

franche

By Brownalum (Brownalum) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 02:15 pm: Edit

Franche, it depends what you want. Yale and Berkeley have top-notch physics departments and Brown is also very good.

Reed is a good choice if you want a very small college - like Yale, Reed tends to send a large proportion of its graduates on to earn Ph.D.'s.

I think you have some great choices - see if you can talk with some of the students and professors before you make a decision. And don't forget to also consider factors that aren't related to physics, such as where you would be happiest and learn the most :)

By Sgiovinc (Sgiovinc) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 02:43 pm: Edit

Brownalum:

Major would be Chemisty or Biochemistry..still waiting for JHU, but prospect looks bleak...so out of carnegie, stevens, geneseo, georgia tech, tulane eng, would like to stay up north, for a woman, what would you select???

you seem to be quite knowledgeable...

By Sgiovinc (Sgiovinc) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 02:44 pm: Edit

oh, would want to ultimately be a Food or Flavor Chemist for PEPSICO, Kraft foods, etc.

By Carolyn (Carolyn) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 02:49 pm: Edit

Sgiovinc, Of your list, I'd choose Carnegie Mellon assuming all other factors were equal.

Frenche, Of the schools on your list, for Physics, if all else was equal, I'd choose either UCBerkeley, U of Illinois or Reed. They have the top physics programs on your list of schools. For an LAC, Reed has outstanding opportunities for physics research for undergrads.

Ultimately, however, Sgiovinc and Frenche, all of the schools on both of your lists are fine for your areas of interest so much will depend on what you are seeking in terms of campus feel, etc.
Trust your instincts: go with the choice where you think you'd feel most comfortable living for four years. Good luck!

By Sgiovinc (Sgiovinc) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 03:07 pm: Edit

thank you Carolyn

By Sgiovinc (Sgiovinc) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 03:07 pm: Edit

thank you Carolyn

By Brownalum (Brownalum) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 03:47 pm: Edit

Sgovinc wrote: "Major would be Chemisty or Biochemistry..still waiting for JHU, but prospect looks bleak...so out of carnegie, stevens, geneseo, georgia tech, tulane eng, would like to stay up north, for a woman, what would you select???"

Obviously, go with JHU if you get in. But out of the remainder, Carnegie Mellon and Georgia Tech have by far the best programs in chemistry. Personally, I would select Carnegie Mellon.


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Carolyn wrote: "either UCBerkeley, U of Illinois or Reed. They have the top physics programs on your list of schools."

I disagree. Brown and Yale - and Reed - among others, have much more successful graduates in the sciences than either Berkeley or UIUC, as measured by the percent of students who go on to win prestigious doctoral fellowships (such as the NSF).

Yale, Berkeley and Illinois-UC are all among the top 10 universities in the United States in PHYSICS (according to the National Academy of Sciences/National Research Council's EdEff ranking), and Brown ranks a respectable #25.

By Franche (Franche) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 04:13 pm: Edit

Thank you brownalum, I just have to wait for the results of YALe and Brown, if i am admited to yale, i will have to decide between yale and UC berkeley, I guess i would choose yale beacause of its prestige, but honestly other than that i can't think of anything that puts yale over berkeley, any comments?

By Brownalum (Brownalum) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 08:40 pm: Edit

"other than that i can't think of anything that puts yale over berkeley"

Since I'm not affiliated with either school I can give you an honest opinion based on the facts. Take what you hear from other people with a grain of salt: some have an agenda in promoting Yale or Berkeley, and some hate Yale or Berkeley probably because they were rejected by Yale and/or Berkeley. Basically, here are the facts:

There are differences between Yale and Berkeley like you wouldn't imagine. A handful of statistics on paper (of which many are likely incorrect, especially if they come from USNews or some other outside source) won't tell you anything about the campus life, social life, academics or anything else about the two schools.


The main reason that students choose Yale is the residential college system, which is only really found at Yale - although other universities have recently decided to rename their dormitories "colleges" in an attempt to compete with Yale (this is like putting gift wrap around a piece of concrete and calling it jewelry). If you go to the "Yale" section of this discussion board and post there, there are probably some current Yale students around who could describe them.

Yale also has much smaller class sizes than Berkeley. If you take the real student:faculty ratios in the most popular undergraduate majors -- by dividing the number of majors by the number of professors in that department -- at Yale it is about 5:1 (probably the lowest in the country outside Caltech), versus 15:1 at Berkeley.

Finally, the level of resources is just different. At Yale there is money available for everything because there just is. Yale has an endowment of a million dollars per student. Berkeley is a public university with a relatively small endowment that translates to about 1/10th that of Yale per student. That means A) everything just runs more smoothly at Yale and B) if you ever want to produce, direct and put up your own play or travel to Mozambique for the summer, Yale will give you money to do that whereas Berkeley will laugh you out the door if you even ask.

One area where Yale and Berkeley are both good is campus life. The way the campuses are almost always described is that they are "buzzing with activity." At both campuses you'll find a lot of people having fun, meeting one another and stopping to talk with random people at "kiosks," informally socializing (people running into each other and stopping for an hour to sit by a walkway and chat or meet new people) and that sort of thing. The informal socialization is actually part of the reason why Yale and Berkeley are both renowned for having "activist" campuses - because it's easy to run into and find lots of people in a short period of time. In particular, at Yale, the entire undergraduate population lives within a five minute walk of each other. If you look at Harvard, for example, it takes twenty minutes or half an hour to get from one dorm to the other, which means you can't just walk across the street to see if there are any parties.


Finally, yes you are correct that Yale is much more prestigious than Berkeley. But that's for a very good reason. On average, Yale alumni are about 10 times more successful than Berkeley alumni at getting prestigious fellowships, getting into top graduate schools, or being in interesting jobs that have power and influence.


Anyhow, both are great, but you definitely should consider at least some of these things before making a decision.

Although I'm more familiar with Brown - if you post in the Brown discussion forum I can answer questions there - Brown is also very different from Berkeley. Brown is more similar to Yale, except without the huge amounts of money/resources laying around for students to take advantage of and without the residential colleges.

By Sgiovinc (Sgiovinc) on Wednesday, March 31, 2004 - 09:08 pm: Edit

thanks brownalum


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