Good program in Classics





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Discus: College Search and Selection: March 2004 Archive: Good program in Classics
By Momof3girls (Momof3girls) on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 01:07 am: Edit

My daughter is looking for a college with a good Classics department. Any advice?

By Mackinaw (Mackinaw) on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 01:36 am: Edit

Big college or small college? Private or public? How selective a college are you looking for? Any other preferences?

For starters, too good ones: one private (Reed -- http://academic.reed.edu/classics/); one public (Univ. of Michigan -- http://www.umich.edu/~classics/undergrad/).

There are many more.

By Scma (Scma) on Saturday, February 28, 2004 - 07:09 pm: Edit

My son is a freshman majoring in classics at Georgetown and really enjoying the program so far. The department is small, but very active (dinners, speakers, etc) and he already knows most of the professors. He speaks highly of them all. He had studied latin (4 years) and greek (3 years)in high school and I was concerned that he would outgrow Georgetown's program (they do not offer a graduate degree in classics). It doesn't seem that this will be a problem - plenty of upper level courses offered. I believe my son would say that any Jesuit school values classics and should have a decent department.
We had also looked at Penn and I know of someone there who speaks very highly of their program. Boston University has an excellent program and offers merit scholarships in Latin and in Greek (they give exams each fall). Holy Cross also offers merit scholarships for classics students and has a well regarded program - I am not sure of the criteria they use for awarding the scholarships.

By Scma (Scma) on Sunday, February 29, 2004 - 06:02 am: Edit

I should also mention that from the little I have looked into them, Harvard, Yale and University of Chicago seem to have good doctoral programs so I would imagine the undergrad programs are good. And, Duke runs a good semester long program in Rome, so you may want to look at Duke as well.

By Pattykk (Pattykk) on Sunday, February 29, 2004 - 10:06 am: Edit

Is there a resurgence of interest in classics? Do most graduates go into teaching?

By Sisyphus (Sisyphus) on Sunday, February 29, 2004 - 11:38 am: Edit

It's that book Secret History

By Recienvenido (Recienvenido) on Sunday, February 29, 2004 - 12:18 pm: Edit

Upon closer inspection, you will find that Duke's semester program in Rome incorporates students (in addition to Duke's own) largely from the following schools:

http://www.aas.duke.edu/study_abroad/iccs/members.html

I would imagine that it is fairly selective in terms of admissions, though, as only thirty-six places are available each semester.

By Matto311 (Matto311) on Wednesday, March 03, 2004 - 10:26 pm: Edit

University of Chicago's is probably one of the most well-known.

The University of Notre Dame also has great Classics program with outstanding faculty. Opportunities to travel abroad include a summer internship through the Kenough center, as well as opportunities to study in Dublin, Ireland for a year.

http://classics.nd.edu/


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